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February 2000 Archives

Encryption at the mercy of the law - VNUNET

'The Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Bill, which allows police to intercept network data, sparked a storm of controversy when it was published by the UK government. The Bill, published on 10 February, updates legislation on the monitoring and interception of public and private communications and data by law enforcement agencies. It sets out rules and regulations for wire-tapping phones and data lines within ISP infrastructure, and the decoding of privately encrypted data.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:47 PM Mon 28 Feb 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
Irish, UK Crypto Regs Far Apart - Wired News

'DUBLIN, Ireland -- Britain is likely to become the first country in the world to make imprisonment a possible consequence of refusing to surrender, or even losing, one's private encryption keys. At the same time, neighboring Ireland is preparing legislation that would make it the first country to prohibit law enforcement from forcing encryption users to hand over their private keys.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:42 PM Wed 16 Feb 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Wired News
Bullies, teenagers and Net giants - ZDNET

'Known as RIP to its friends (it has few) and its enemies (it has many), the bill would benefit from taking advice from eighties Indie band Orange Jucie. "Rip it up and start again" would definitely be the best thing for it. While privacy advocates question why the government needs the ability to intercept email, Human Rights campaigners point out that the bill breaks the European Convention of Human Rights. It reverses the burden of proof (if you are suspected of owning a decryption key, you are now guilty until proven innocent). And finally the government has incensed Internet service providers who will have to shell out millions to get interception equipment installed.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:39 PM Mon 14 Feb 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , ZDNET
Ministers seek wide bugging powers - The Guardian

'Sweeping powers allowing the intelligence services and other government agencies to conduct covert surveillance, including bugging phones and property, were proposed by the government yesterday. For the first time, they would have a statutory power to intercept pagers, mobile and satellite phones, and email, as well as private networks, including office switchboards.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:29 PM Fri 11 Feb 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
E-Spying Bill Called 'Escrow By Intimidation' - TechWeb

'The British government published a bill Thursday to update law enforcement's interception powers to include communications made via company networks and ISPs. The legislation was immediately slammed as threatening human rights and labelled "key escrow through intimidation" by Internet think tank the Foundation For Information Policy Research (FIPR). Key escrow is a failed policy by which users of encryption software lodge copies of security keys with third parties approved by government.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:25 PM Thu 10 Feb 2000 Categories: Human Rights , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , TechWeb
New surveillance bill comes under fire - ZDNET

'Regulation of Investigatory Powers bill violates human rights law, say civil liberties campaigners. The government Thursday published the Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Bill, branded "impossible" by Internet campaigners for its potential human rights conflicts.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:23 PM Thu 10 Feb 2000 Categories: Human Rights , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , ZDNET
Surveillance bill under fire - BBC

'The UK Government came under fire on Thursday from the internet community after it published a Bill to regulate covert surveillance. The critics say the legislation, if passed, could lead to innocent people being sent to jail simply because they have lost their data encryption codes.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:21 PM Thu 10 Feb 2000 Categories: BBC , Human Rights , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III)