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Archives for 'RIP Forced Decryption (Part III)' category.

UK stands firm on snooping laws - Reports/Equiries

UK stands firm on snooping laws - The UK Government is determined to push ahead with its plans for internet snooping despite mounting opposition.

Posted by SteveC at 04:10 PM Thu 30 Jan 2003 Categories: BBC , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , RIP Oversight (Part IV) , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2) , Reports/Equiries
APIG report complete - Reports/Equiries

The All Party Internet Group (APIG) inquiry into Government access to communications data has been released here. See also the oral and written evidence. Also APIG press notices.

Posted by SteveC at 03:56 PM Tue 28 Jan 2003 Categories: Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , RIP Oversight (Part IV) , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2) , Reports/Equiries
FPIR Consultation Response - Reports/Equiries

FIPR response to the All Party Internet Group public inquiry into all aspects of communications data retention and the subsequent access to that data.

Posted by SteveC at 03:25 PM Sun 15 Dec 2002 Categories: RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , RIP Oversight (Part IV) , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2) , Reports/Equiries
The net closes on civil liberties - The Guardian

'My parents and I came to the UK as refugees from Poland in 1969. In Poland, our phone was tapped, letters were opened, movements monitored and associations carefully noted and used against us. After 33 years in a country I have grown to love, it is surprising that the government wants to read my emails, monitor my phone calls, work out my movements, who I associate with and how I spend my money' link

Posted by SteveC at 06:46 PM Thu 13 Jun 2002 Categories: Human Rights , Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
Pedos volunteered system passwords to cops - The Register

'A spokeswoman for the National Crime Squad told The Independent that "We were only able to get into their systems when they voluntarily gave us their passwords."

If the same situation were to arise today, the suspect would be obliged, under the RIP Act, to furnish the investigators with the key to decrypt their data. However, the Operation Cathedral investigation predated the Act becoming law.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:53 PM Wed 14 Feb 2001 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , Surveillance & Security , The Register
Encryption tears holes in RIP - The Register

'A group of cryptographers think they have found a way to defeat the RIP Act, by making it impossible to hand over the keys to encrypted information.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:16 PM Thu 7 Dec 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , Surveillance & Security , Technical countermeasures , The Register
Cyber Rights Hush up new RIP powers - The Register

'Cyber Rights.net has "formed an alliance" with Hush Communications to beat new RIP powers by offering super-encrypted email off its site.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:29 PM Wed 1 Nov 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Register
The RIP Act - The Guardian

'The RIP Act, which comes into force today, allows the government to intercept online communications. Julian Glover and Patrick Barkham examine the controversy surrounding the new act and the implications for privacy and e-commerce' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:20 PM Tue 24 Oct 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , RIP Oversight (Part IV) , Reverse of burden of proof , The Guardian
The RIP Act - The Guardian

'The RIP Act, which comes into force today, allows the government to intercept online communications. Julian Glover and Patrick Barkham examine the controversy surrounding the new act and the implications for privacy and e-commerce' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:27 PM Sun 24 Sep 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , Privacy , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
'Snooping Bill technically inept' - BBC

'The UK Government's plans to eavesdrop on criminals that use the internet are "technically inept", say security experts.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:09 PM Wed 26 Jul 2000 Categories: BBC , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Reports/Equiries
How to dodge RIP - The Register

'A report due to be published tonight will explain how to dodge the government's email snooping bill via a few simple steps' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:07 PM Wed 26 Jul 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Register
PSINet joins ISP stampede over 'Snooping Bill' - Silicon.com

'One of the world's largest internet service providers, PSINet, has said it will seriously consider leaving the UK if the government passes its controversial Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Bill.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:02 PM Fri 21 Jul 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , Silicon.com
Peers pass e-mail interception bill - BBC

'Plans to allow the security services to intercept private e-mails have passed the House of Lords.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:00 PM Thu 20 Jul 2000 Categories: BBC , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III)
RIP branded 'zombie legislation' as it passes Lords - The Register

'The Lords forced a fresh set of concessions on the government yesterday before passing its email snooping bill.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:59 PM Thu 20 Jul 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Register
Snooping bill passed by House of Lords - VNUNET

'The UK government's communications privacy bill passed relatively smoothly through the House of Lords yesterday, with just one of the 51 amendments scheduled to be heard requiring a vote.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:57 PM Thu 20 Jul 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , VNUNET
That charter for snoopers - The Guardian

'Parliament today has its last opportunity to object to the government plan to give sweeping new powers for intelligence agencies - indeed, any public authority - to conduct covert surveillance, including intercepting emails and bugging property.' link

Posted by SteveC at 05:12 PM Wed 19 Jul 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Lords join the left to curb net snoopers - The Guardian

'It is probably the most complex and technically drafted bill to go through parliament in 40 years, and even now, with the honourable exception of six or so Labour backbenchers, no one in the parliamentary Labour party has bothered to understand it. There is enormous cynicsm among MPs. They don't think they are going to get brownie points with their constituencies if they rebel.' link

Posted by SteveC at 05:07 PM Wed 19 Jul 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
Further RIP Bill changes tabled - VNUNET

'The UK government has tabled changes to the so-called snooping bill ahead of its third reading in the House of Lords on Wednesday, but the Bill's critics remain unconvinced.' link

Posted by SteveC at 05:05 PM Tue 18 Jul 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , VNUNET
UK snooping bill key amendment defeated - VNUNET

'An amendment to the so-called snooping bill requiring the Home Secretary to sign all warrants requesting decryption codes was defeated by just one vote in the House of Lords yesterday.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:52 PM Fri 14 Jul 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , VNUNET
Safeguard over e-mail 'snooping' Bill - BBC

'The government has agreed a new safeguard on its 'snooping Bill' aimed at tackling cyber crime, to try to ease opponents' fears over potential abuse by security forces.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:41 PM Thu 13 Jul 2000 Categories: BBC , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
Police email snooping powers tamed - VNUNET

'Home Office ministers have moved to restrict the police's power to snoop on internet surfing and email, to ease the public's fears of 'Big Brother' law enforcement.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:19 PM Fri 7 Jul 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
House of Lords slows progress of RIP Bill - VNUNET

'Opposition lords claimed last week that there was a chance, with cross-party support, that they could make significant amendments to curb the "worst" aspects of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Bill. The legislation is certainly getting a bumpy ride, but it would not be the first time that proposals extending surveillance powers have been rejected.' link

Posted by SteveC at 01:15 PM Thu 29 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , VNUNET
Ministers amend net snooping legislation - BBC

'Several key changes are being made to the UK Government's controversial plans to allow the police sweeping powers to monitor e-mails. The Home Office has said that under the changes the home secretary must sign a warrant before an individual's e-mails can be monitored.' link

Posted by SteveC at 01:00 PM Tue 27 Jun 2000 Categories: BBC , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , Reverse of burden of proof
RIP bill no match for technology - The Guardian

'The government's contentious internet surveillance bill, already under threat from the House of Lords, could be rendered unenforceable by simple security mechanisms that already exist.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:57 PM Tue 27 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
Ministers back down on email 'spy charter' - The Guardian

'The government is to back down following public uproar over a new security services legal framework, which critics claim will give British spies untrammelled access to email.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:56 PM Tue 27 Jun 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
U.K. pulls back on cybersnoop bill - CNN

'(IDG) -- In the face of increasing pressure from privacy groups, business groups and Internet service providers (ISPs), the U.K. government is backing away from some of the more controversial aspects of its e-mail surveillance bill currently under consideration in the House of Lords.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:53 PM Mon 26 Jun 2000 Categories: CNN , Cost to industry , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
RIP could scupper our e-revolution - The Observer

'If John Carr really believes the opposition to the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill is Thatcherite, élitist and anti-democratic, perhaps he should get out more. But in any case the Bill will have minimal effect on crime because all but the most stupid criminals will simply switch to a foreign internet service provider for their emails, if necessary via a mobile phone.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:51 PM Sun 25 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Observer
Big browser is watching the web - The Observer

'Type a few words into a web search-engine and you can find information on any subject in seconds. What happens next depends what one is thinking about and one's reaction to that information. RIP's proponents say the internet is like a public space, and just as the police don't need a judge's warrant merely to keep any eye on someone in the street, they must be allowed to track any person's movements as they click from website to website.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:49 PM Sun 25 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Observer
Straw braced for defeat over RIP bill - The Guardian

'The beleaguered Home Office, already facing criticism over its handling of asylum seekers and football hooligans, is also bracing itself for the prospect of a swath of defeats over the regulation of the internet.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:30 PM Mon 19 Jun 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
'Doing nothing is just not an option' - The Guardian

'Opponents of the new controls are elitist, Thatcherite and afraid of democracy' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:22 PM Sun 18 Jun 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
Liberty RIP - The Guardian

'It is very disingenuous of John Abbott, head of the National Criminal Intelligence Service, and home office minister Charles Clarke (Letters, June 15) to argue that the regulation of investigatory powers bill simply aims to increase the accountability of the security services. This is not true.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:00 PM Sat 17 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
Net tapping Bill fatally flawed - VNUNET

'A technical loophole that could render the Government's Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill (RIP) useless has been exposed' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:36 PM Fri 16 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
We won't read your emails - The Guardian

'The regulation of investigatory powers bill continues to be branded as a "massive extension of the state's power to spy on citizens" (Leader, June 12). This bill does not introduce new powers. It does, however, update the law enforcement agencies existing and highly regulated powers to fight organised criminals exploiting developing communications technology. A warrant, signed by the home secretary, will be needed to monitor emails in the same way one is needed now to monitor communications.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:37 PM Thu 15 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , RIP Oversight (Part IV) , The Guardian
Straw enters bitter row over RIP Bill - ZDNET

'In a week when the RIP Bill has been hit by increased and often bitter criticism, enter the Home Secretary to defend the government's plans, and criticise the British Chambers of Commerce's report' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:33 PM Thu 15 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , ZDNET
Data protection chief swipes out at spying Bill - ZDNET

'Britain's data protection commissioner Elizabeth France hit out at the government's controversial cyber-surveillance bill Wednesday.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:31 PM Wed 14 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , ZDNET
Lords to fight email tap bill - The Guardian

'The government's bill to allow MI5 access to encoded email last night faced the start of what may be a fatal drubbing from a cross-party coalition of peers concerned about both civil liberties and the security of business transactions.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:24 PM Tue 13 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Concern over U.K. e-mail surveillance bill grows - CNN

'A surveillance bill that would give the U.K. government sweeping powers to access e-mail and other encrypted Internet communications is coming under increasing criticism from companies and organizations as the bill heads for a vote in the House of Lords this week' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:22 PM Tue 13 Jun 2000 Categories: CNN , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
Offshore haven - The Guardian

'The government last night poured cold water on a plan by group of entrepreneurs to establish a "data haven" on a rusting iron fortress in the North Sea in an attempt to circumvent new anti-cryptography laws.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:00 PM Tue 6 Jun 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
Watching while you surf - BBC

'The UK is leading the world when it comes to high-tech spying on its citizens, say civil liberty and privacy groups.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:24 PM Thu 25 May 2000 Categories: BBC , Privacy , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
UK government forces through net spy bill - VNUNET

'The UK government is bracing itself for a major fight in the Lords over the cost and scope of legislation forcing ISPs to give police access to customers' internet traffic.'

Posted by SteveC at 03:53 PM Wed 10 May 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
Snooping bill under attack again - VNUNET

'The Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Bill, which will give the state powers to eavesdrop on internet traffic, was amended by the government in its third Commons reading on Monday, but without satisfying its critics.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:51 PM Wed 10 May 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , VNUNET
Tories demand tougher computer penalties - BBC

'People who refuse to allow authorities access to coded information on their computers should face a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison, the UK's Conservative party says.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:49 PM Tue 9 May 2000 Categories: BBC , Human Rights , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III)
Jack Straw wants the keys to your office. Don't let him in ... - The Observer

'Big mistake. It's becoming clear that Straw & Co have no idea of the nightmare they are creating. Their screwball Bill is the product of a shambles in Whitehall over online regulation.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:41 PM Sun 16 Apr 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Observer
Website campaign to derail legislation - BBC

'Stand.org.uk, comprising e-commerce entrepreneurs and new media thinkers, say that the public has sent more than 1,500 faxes from its website to MPs within two weeks of the launch of their new campaign against the bill.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:31 PM Fri 31 Mar 2000 Categories: BBC , Govt. Consultations , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III)
RIP IT UP - SchNEWS

'Imagine if the police or government officials could force you to hand over your house keys, so they could let themselves in and have a quick shuffle through the mail every morning. Well, in a new draft of Home Office legislation, the cyber equivalent of ‘state mail sorting’ will make any computer user failing to hand over their encryption keys (or computer password codes) a criminal facing up to two years in prison. And under an even darker scenario, if you happen to ‘tip’ someone off that their e-mails are being screened, then you could face a five year stretch inside.' link

Posted by SteveC at 01:53 PM Fri 31 Mar 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , SchNEWS
Protection or persecution? - The Guardian

'Feelings are running high in the e-world over the RIP - regulation of investigatory powers - bill. Here, Peter Sommer gives the background to a debate between two of the leading protagonists' link

Posted by SteveC at 01:49 PM Thu 30 Mar 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
It's RIP basic human rights in 'worst UK legislation ever' looms - The Guardian

'To LSE for a conference on the Interior Ministry's Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Bill, currently in Committee in the Mother of Parliaments. Readers of this column will know that, among other things, this odious piece of legislation reverses the ancient principle of natural justice that says that a person should be pre sumed innocent until proven guilty.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:22 AM Sun 26 Mar 2000 Categories: Govt. Consultations , Human Rights , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
NTK 2000-03-24 - NTK

Like a supply teacher late for his first class, Charles Clarke, Home Office minister in charge of Not Being Scared by The Crypto Freaks, looked most put out by the giggling during his speech at Wednesday's SCRAMBLING FOR SAFETY. Whenever he tried to praise the work done by the experts in the audience, the experts laughed - and not in a nice, self-deprecatory way.

Posted by SteveC at 12:18 AM Fri 24 Mar 2000 Categories: Govt. Consultations , NTK , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III)
Ripping into U.K. Privacy Bill - Wired News

'LONDON -- Privacy advocates say a proposed bill that could force Internet service providers hand over data traffic information would harm Britain's e-commerce environment and encourage e-business companies to locate elsewhere. But in keeping with the heated tone the debate has taken, one government official attending a conference Wednesday at the London School of Economics claimed the bill would help "make the U.K. the best place in the world for e-commerce." ' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:11 AM Thu 23 Mar 2000 Categories: Govt. Consultations , Human Rights , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , Wired News
UK government answers snooping bill critics - VNUNET

'The Home Office minister in charge of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Bill has publicly defended the controversial legislation against accusations that it breeches human rights.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:09 AM Thu 23 Mar 2000 Categories: Govt. Consultations , Human Rights , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , VNUNET
Industry tackles UK government over snooping bill - VNUNET

'Industry groups and encryption users will today get their first chance to grill UK government ministers and Home Office officials in public about the controversial communications snooping bill.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:03 AM Wed 22 Mar 2000 Categories: Govt. Consultations , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , VNUNET
RIP bill gets buried under fax mountain - ZDNET

'Stand.org.uk sets up fax protest in response to government's controversial RIP Bill
MPs have been bombarded by thousands of faxes from Internet users incensed at the government's controversial Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Bill.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:00 AM Tue 21 Mar 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , ZDNET
NTK 2000-03-17 - NTK

'St Patrick's Day, and a fitting time to answer a few mails we've had regarding the RIP Bill. Given, say our correspondents, the new insecurities installed into ISPs by the Bill would a solution be to log onto Irish ISPs, given their government's more enlightened approach to preserving privacy?' link

Posted by SteveC at 11:58 PM Fri 17 Mar 2000 Categories: NTK , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III)
The key to security (Letter from Charles Clarke) - The Guardian

The regulation of investigatory powers RIP bill updates vital powers for a changing technological world in a way consistent with the requirements of the European convention on human rights (Leader, March 7). These powers will be subject to safeguards and external supervision more tightly drawn than ever before. link

Posted by SteveC at 03:20 PM Fri 10 Mar 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
Net sets a legal challenge - The Guardian

'Your leader (March 7) on some of the implications of the regulation of investigatory powers (RIP) bill was wrong on one important count: there is no presumption of guilt. Before a person might be convicted of failing to produce for the police the necessary key to decrypt an encrypted file, a jury has to be convinced that the person concerned was in possession of that key. A jury would therefore be invited to conclude that the person's failure now to produce the key was simply an attempt to avoid disclosing the content of their encrypted messages or files.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:17 PM Wed 8 Mar 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
Opposition Against Encryption Bill - ComputerUser.com

'A wave of media-led resentment against the proposed Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) bill, which critics say will give the government the all-clear to monitor private e-mail and mobile phone conversations, has started rising. UK civil liberties groups say that the legislation, if enacted, would result in otherwise innocent people going to jail if they lose their data encryption codes.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:11 PM Wed 8 Mar 2000 Categories: ComputerUser.com , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III)
RIP for basic liberties - The Guardian

'Michael Gapes, Labour MP for Ilford South, told the Commons yesterday how his father as a postman would have to deliver letters to a certain place where they were opened then resealed before continuing their journey to the recipient's house. He was speaking during the second reading of the controversial regulation of investigatory powers (RIP) bill. Everyone knows that interception takes place and that it is the duty of the authorities to hunt down drug-pushers, paedophiles and money-launderers by all legal means. The RIP bill still fails to strike the right balance between an individual's right to privacy and the state's duty to track down criminals. Even Jack Straw at his most avuncular could not explain why the right to authorise interception should rest with him (and his less avuncular successors) rather than with judges as in many other countries.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:06 PM Tue 7 Mar 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
Computer crime plans attacked - BBC

'Laws proposed by the UK Government to enable the interception of electronic communications in the battle against organised crime have been criticised as appalling and objectionable.The Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill debate was opened by the Home Secretary Jack Straw who said law enforcement agencies worldwide were worried about the criminal use of encryption to send coded electronic messages. He said UK and the US was putting in place a package of measures to tackle the problem.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:05 PM Tue 7 Mar 2000 Categories: BBC , Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III)
U.K. Crypto Law a Key Issue - Wired News

'LONDON -- Law enforcement officials speaking to the House of Commons said criminals were using the Internet and without new powers those crimes would go undetected by police. Their comments came Monday as home secretary Jack Straw announced the second reading of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill. The measure would update legislation and give more power to law enforcement agencies to intercept electronic communications.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:02 PM Tue 7 Mar 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , Wired News
UK email interception bill stumbles - VNUNET

'The government's proposed communications interception bill could be delayed after the Conservative Party asked for a key part of the proposal to be changed. Shadow Home Secretary, Anne Widdecombe, said during The Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill's second reading in the House of Commons today, that the Tories would oppose the third reading of the bill if the 'burden of proof' part of it was not changed.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:00 PM Tue 7 Mar 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , VNUNET
Editorial comment: Spies in the web - Financial Times

'Big Brother only had television cameras to spy into our living rooms. Today's governments have computers, with power far beyond anything imagined by George Orwell in his chilling novel 1984. But to make best use of their surveillance of internet data, they need to have the keys to the encryption systems now routinely used to defend privacy. Yesterday Jack Straw introduced a bill in Britain's House of (Commons that would give the authorities more intrusive powers than in any other western democracy.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:08 PM Mon 6 Mar 2000 Categories: Financial Times , Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III)
NTK lead - NTK

'On Monday, the REGULATION OF INVESTIGATORY POWERS BILL will get its second reading in the Commons. Then it goes to committee, then it becomes law, and then you'll never hear from it again, because talking about most of its powers will get you five years in prison. So, when the police ask your ISP to put a tap on your mail, you won't hear about it. When your local trades and standards officer decides to take a look at your browser log for the last month, you won't hear about it. And when they come and get your private encryption key so that can read your friend's mails, you won't be able to tell your friend - or us - that it happened. Hell, you won't even be able to change your key if that might give us a clue.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:56 PM Fri 3 Mar 2000 Categories: NTK , Privacy , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
Government snooping will cost taxpayers millions - ZDNET

'Plans to seize encryption keys from crime suspects will leave them vulnerable to theft and misuse. Government snooping plans will cost the taxpayer "hundreds of millions" of pounds, according to a report published on Monday.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:50 PM Wed 1 Mar 2000 Categories: FIPR releases , Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , ZDNET
Encryption at the mercy of the law - VNUNET

'The Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Bill, which allows police to intercept network data, sparked a storm of controversy when it was published by the UK government. The Bill, published on 10 February, updates legislation on the monitoring and interception of public and private communications and data by law enforcement agencies. It sets out rules and regulations for wire-tapping phones and data lines within ISP infrastructure, and the decoding of privately encrypted data.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:47 PM Mon 28 Feb 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
Irish, UK Crypto Regs Far Apart - Wired News

'DUBLIN, Ireland -- Britain is likely to become the first country in the world to make imprisonment a possible consequence of refusing to surrender, or even losing, one's private encryption keys. At the same time, neighboring Ireland is preparing legislation that would make it the first country to prohibit law enforcement from forcing encryption users to hand over their private keys.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:42 PM Wed 16 Feb 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Wired News
Bullies, teenagers and Net giants - ZDNET

'Known as RIP to its friends (it has few) and its enemies (it has many), the bill would benefit from taking advice from eighties Indie band Orange Jucie. "Rip it up and start again" would definitely be the best thing for it. While privacy advocates question why the government needs the ability to intercept email, Human Rights campaigners point out that the bill breaks the European Convention of Human Rights. It reverses the burden of proof (if you are suspected of owning a decryption key, you are now guilty until proven innocent). And finally the government has incensed Internet service providers who will have to shell out millions to get interception equipment installed.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:39 PM Mon 14 Feb 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , ZDNET
Ministers seek wide bugging powers - The Guardian

'Sweeping powers allowing the intelligence services and other government agencies to conduct covert surveillance, including bugging phones and property, were proposed by the government yesterday. For the first time, they would have a statutory power to intercept pagers, mobile and satellite phones, and email, as well as private networks, including office switchboards.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:29 PM Fri 11 Feb 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
E-Spying Bill Called 'Escrow By Intimidation' - TechWeb

'The British government published a bill Thursday to update law enforcement's interception powers to include communications made via company networks and ISPs. The legislation was immediately slammed as threatening human rights and labelled "key escrow through intimidation" by Internet think tank the Foundation For Information Policy Research (FIPR). Key escrow is a failed policy by which users of encryption software lodge copies of security keys with third parties approved by government.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:25 PM Thu 10 Feb 2000 Categories: Human Rights , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , TechWeb
New surveillance bill comes under fire - ZDNET

'Regulation of Investigatory Powers bill violates human rights law, say civil liberties campaigners. The government Thursday published the Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Bill, branded "impossible" by Internet campaigners for its potential human rights conflicts.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:23 PM Thu 10 Feb 2000 Categories: Human Rights , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , ZDNET
Surveillance bill under fire - BBC

'The UK Government came under fire on Thursday from the internet community after it published a Bill to regulate covert surveillance. The critics say the legislation, if passed, could lead to innocent people being sent to jail simply because they have lost their data encryption codes.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:21 PM Thu 10 Feb 2000 Categories: BBC , Human Rights , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III)