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Archives for 'Privacy' category.

National database will hold details of 50,000 offenders - The Independent

'A national database containing details of more than 50,000 violent and sex offenders, as well as some unconvicted suspects, is being set up to track dangerous criminals.' link

Posted by SteveC at 05:38 PM Fri 3 Oct 2003 Categories: Privacy , The Independent
Secret go-ahead for ID card database - The Guardian

'The cabinet has secretly given the go-ahead to the chancellor, Gordon Brown, to set up Britain's first national population computer database that is the foundation stone for a compulsory identity card scheme.' link

Posted by SteveC at 05:29 PM Tue 30 Sep 2003 Categories: ID Cards , Privacy , The Guardian
Hewitt is first minister to oppose identity cards - The Independent

'The rift in the Cabinet over compulsory identity cards deepened yesterday after Patricia Hewitt, the Trade and Industry Secretary, spelt out her "grave reservations".' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:01 PM Sat 27 Sep 2003 Categories: ID Cards , Privacy , The Independent
Identity politics - The Guardian

'David Blunkett has long considered national identity cards as the answer. In the home secretary's mind, it is just that the British public has yet to ask the question. There is good reason for this: voters are reluctant to let government keep tabs on them and do not trust ministers to protect their privacy. History also points in the opposite direction to Mr Blunkett's hunches. Compulsory identity cards have been used during two world wars - but were dropped in peacetime. The home secretary appears undeterred.' link

Posted by SteveC at 09:17 AM Tue 23 Sep 2003 Categories: ID Cards , Privacy , The Guardian
Silenced: Censorship and Control of the Internet - Privacy International

'Silenced is an independent research initiative managed jointly by Privacy International and the GreenNet Educational Trust. The twelve-month project was undertaken through a collaboration of more than fifty experts and advocates throughout the world.' link

Posted by SteveC at 06:45 PM Sun 21 Sep 2003 Categories: Data retention , Privacy , Privacy International , Reports/Equiries
UK keeps global net censorship ticking over - Silicon.com

'Far from being a haven for civil liberties and free speech, it seems the web is now prey to increasing monitoring and restrictions, according to a global study into internet censorship released today.' link

Posted by SteveC at 06:40 PM Sun 21 Sep 2003 Categories: Privacy , Silicon.com
Home Office snooping plans are almost unchanged - FIPR releases

'In June 2002 the Home Office backed down in the face of the outrage that greeted their totally disproportionate proposals for access to communications data (records of email senders and receivers, phone numbers called or web pages visited). Last week they gave the impression of a change of heart, yet closer examination of the detail of their proposals shows that their plans are almost entirely unchanged.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:20 PM Mon 15 Sep 2003 Categories: FIPR releases , Govt. Consultations , Privacy , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2)
Big Brother edges closer to 'total snooping' - The Telegraph

'Are we, in the arresting words yesterday of Shami Chakrabarti, the new director of Liberty, "the most spied upon people in western Europe"?
With closed circuit television pointed at us wherever we go, speed cameras trained on our cars and an army of public servants entitled to demand our personal telephone details or even follow us around, she seems to have a point.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:11 PM Mon 15 Sep 2003 Categories: Privacy , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2) , The Telegraph
Blunkett: Cabinet split over ID cards - The Independent

'Cabinet members have expressed "perfectly reasonable scepticism" at plans for a national ID card, the Home Secretary said yesterday.' link

Posted by SteveC at 11:30 AM Fri 12 Sep 2003 Categories: ID Cards , Privacy , The Independent
Blunkett fights on to save his ID card - The Guardian

'He candidly told the Commons home affairs select committee in a progress report that the cabinet was split down the middle. But he dismissed reports that John Prescott and Gordon Brown led the opposition. Mr Blunkett's strongest supporter is believed to be Tony Blair.' link

Posted by SteveC at 11:28 AM Fri 12 Sep 2003 Categories: ID Cards , Privacy , The Guardian
Blunkett's ID cards blocked in Cabinet - The Telegraph

'David Blunkett was battling to save his flagship identity card plan last night after failing to win Cabinet backing for legislation in the next session of Parliament.' link

Posted by SteveC at 11:26 AM Fri 12 Sep 2003 Categories: ID Cards , Privacy , The Telegraph
Police seek DNA record of everyone - The Guardian

'Senior police officers will call this week for the the national database of 2m DNA samples to be extended to everyone in the country' link

Posted by SteveC at 06:55 PM Mon 8 Sep 2003 Categories: Human Rights , Privacy , The Guardian
Runaway summer - The Guardian

'The age of closed-circuit TV is bad news for those who dream of escape' link

Posted by SteveC at 06:53 PM Mon 8 Sep 2003 Categories: CCTV , Privacy , The Guardian
Prescott and Brown move to block Blair's ID card plan - The Telegraph

'Tony Blair is facing a Cabinet revolt over the introduction of compulsory identity cards as senior ministers press him to tone down his radical agenda in the run-up to the next general election.' link

Posted by SteveC at 06:50 PM Sun 7 Sep 2003 Categories: ID Cards , Privacy , The Telegraph
'Big Brother' smart tags in stores face legal battle - The Telegraph

'Retailers using microchips in products to track customers are facing legal challenges from freedom campaigners anxious to curb the abuse of the "Big Brother" technology.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:38 PM Mon 1 Sep 2003 Categories: Privacy , RFID Tags , The Telegraph
Want to visit Britain? Join the fingerprint queue - The Register

'The Government today announced plans to extend the use of biometric technology throughout the UK visa system in a crackdown against abuse of the immigration system.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:36 PM Fri 29 Aug 2003 Categories: Human Rights , Privacy , The Register
New children's database will list potential criminals - The Telegraph

'Tony Blair is to announce plans to put up to half a million children deemed at risk of becoming criminals or getting into other trouble on a new computer register. Teachers, family doctors and other professionals working with youngsters will be asked to name potential troublemakers whose personal details will then be placed on the database.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:27 PM Sun 24 Aug 2003 Categories: Human Rights , Privacy , The Telegraph
Goodbye speed cameras, hello a spy in every car - The Times

'EVEN George Orwell would have choked. Government officials are drawing up plans to fit all cars in Britain with a personalised microchip so that rule-breaking motorists can be prosecuted by computer. Dubbed the "Spy in the Dashboard" and "the Informer" the chip will automatically report a wide range of offences including speeding, road tax evasion and illegal parking. The first you will know about it is when a summons or a fine lands on your doormat.' link

Posted by SteveC at 11:39 AM Sun 24 Aug 2003 Categories: Privacy , The Times
Blair orders Blunkett to put identity card scheme on hold - The Independent

'Tony Blair has put off the launch of a plan to compel every Briton to hold an ID card in response to fears that it will turn into an expensive and frustrating assault on liberty.' link

Posted by SteveC at 05:44 PM Fri 1 Aug 2003 Categories: Human Rights , Privacy , The Independent
Too-expensive ID card system 'still some years away' - The Telegraph

'The introduction of identity cards is still some years away, Tony Blair indicated yesterday. Although he supported ID cards in principle, he said huge logistical and cost issues must be resolved.' link

Posted by SteveC at 11:17 AM Thu 31 Jul 2003 Categories: ID Cards , Privacy , The Telegraph
I will fight Labour repression, pledges new head of Liberty - The Telegraph

'The new head of Liberty yesterday committed the civil rights campaign group to resisting the Government's plans to introduce compulsory ID cards and to finding allies beyond the organisation's traditional left-wing support base.' link

Posted by SteveC at 11:15 AM Thu 31 Jul 2003 Categories: Human Rights , ID Cards , Privacy , The Telegraph
Blair shoots down UK ID card scheme - The Register

'UK Prime Minister Tony Blair yesterday knocked the wheels off Home Secretary David Blunkett's ID card bandwagon, citing "huge logistical and cost issues that need to be resolved" before the cards can be implemented. If words such as "privacy" and "freedom" also figured in his reasoning he neglected to share this with us, but he pointed out that the last government (by which he presumably means Tory government, rather than the one he himself baked earlier) had examined the issue "over a period of years" and had come to similar conclusions.'link

Posted by SteveC at 11:12 AM Thu 31 Jul 2003 Categories: ID Cards , Privacy , The Register
ID Cards - The Guardian

'The prime minister signalled his support for ID cards "in principle", but said "huge" logistical and cost issues must be resolved first.' link

Posted by SteveC at 05:40 PM Wed 30 Jul 2003 Categories: Human Rights , Privacy , The Guardian
Identity cards won't stop the terrorists: they're only a fig leaf - The Telegraph

'This volume of correspondence is unprecedented, vastly exceeding the
response to anything I have written before. Many of those who support us
begin with a disclaimer: "I am no Left-wing civil rights fanatic,
but...", and then they go on to express revulsion that the British are
to be monitored like the Poles were under Jaruzelski, and the Chinese
are today...'

Posted by SteveC at 02:56 PM Fri 25 Jul 2003 Categories: ID Cards , Privacy , The Telegraph
Tories join attack on Blunkett over compulsory ID cards plan - The Telegraph

'The Conservatives yesterday joined civil rights groups in voicing opposition to the Government's proposals to introduce compulsory identity cards and criticised David Blunkett, the Home Secretary, for masking his true intentions behind "spin and obscurity".' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:00 PM Thu 17 Jul 2003 Categories: ID Cards , Privacy , The Telegraph
How Mr Willcock's brush with Pc Muckle struck a blow for freedom - The Telegraph

'If opponents of identity cards want a champion, they need look no further than the late Clarence Henry Willcock. He was the last person prosecuted in Britain for refusing to produce his wartime ID card and he spearheaded a public campaign that led to their abolition 50 years ago.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:19 PM Sat 12 Jul 2003 Categories: ID Cards , Privacy , The Telegraph
Inside Blunkett's police state - The Telegraph

'The day for compulsory registration on the new national identity databank is at hand. Every man, woman and child over 16 must report to a police station to be issued with their cards at a cost of £40 each.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:16 PM Sat 12 Jul 2003 Categories: ID Cards , Privacy , The Telegraph
'Magic eye' ID cards clear Cabinet hurdle - The Telegraph

'David Blunkett, the Home Secretary, is to press ahead next week with plans to introduce a compulsory identity card backed by a national citizens' database.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:15 PM Sat 12 Jul 2003 Categories: ID Cards , Privacy , The Telegraph
The plastic revolution - The Guardian

'Storing potentially vast amounts of sensitive data about every citizen in one place presents dangers. One would have to be supremely naive to believe that the information would only ever be used for benign purposes. You might trust this government, Martin, but what about the next one, or the one after that?'

Posted by SteveC at 04:10 PM Sat 12 Jul 2003 Categories: ID Cards , Privacy , The Guardian
UK ID scheme complex, costly, won't work, says expert - The Register

'UK home secretary and serial control freak David Blunkett's national ID card scheme has come under fire from an unlikely source - the company currently deploying Belgium's national ID card scheme. This has a certain piquancy, given that Blunkett thinks the UK is "out of kilter" with Europe on ID cards, yet here we have an outfit that knows what it's talking about reckoning that he is out of kilter with ID card thinking.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:11 PM Fri 11 Jul 2003 Categories: ID Cards , Privacy , The Register
CCTV to spot 'odd' behaviour on Tube - The Times

'A CLOSED-CIRCUIT television system that can detect suspicious behaviour is being tested this week at two London Underground stations.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:07 PM Thu 10 Jul 2003 Categories: Privacy , The Times
Plans for '£40 ID cards - BBC

'People aged over 16 in the UK may soon have to pay nearly £40 for a compulsory identity card, it is being reported.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:06 PM Tue 8 Jul 2003 Categories: BBC , ID Cards , Privacy
ID CARDS SCHEME BLASTED - The Mirror

'CIVIL rights groups yesterday slammed proposals for compulsory ID cards. Home Secretary David Blunkett wants to press ahead with the controversial £1.6billion scheme, despite the concerns of civil liberties groups.' link

Posted by SteveC at 06:23 PM Mon 7 Jul 2003 Categories: ID Cards , Privacy , The Mirror
ID hi - The Sun

'WHY should anyone object to having an ID card?
Being able to establish who you are can be very useful.' link

Posted by SteveC at 06:22 PM Mon 7 Jul 2003 Categories: ID Cards , Privacy , The Sun
Blunkett plan for ID cards for adults denounced by civil liberties groups - The Independent

'David Blunkett provoked a storm of protest yesterday from civil liberties groups over plans for the introduction of identity cards in Britain. In a leaked letter to John Prescott, the Deputy Prime Minister, the Home Secretary sets out proposals to charge every person about £39 to carry an electronic identity card.' link

Posted by SteveC at 06:19 PM Mon 7 Jul 2003 Categories: ID Cards , Privacy , The Independent
Blunkett's ID cards 'threat to freedom' - The Telegraph

'David Blunkett was accused by civil liberties campaigners last night of planning "the biggest threat to freedom since the Second World War" after a leaked memo showed he is pushing the Cabinet to back national identity cards for everyone aged 16 and over.' link

Posted by SteveC at 06:18 PM Mon 7 Jul 2003 Categories: ID Cards , Privacy , The Telegraph
Blunkett has "underestimated" cost of ID cards - Silicon.com

'The real cost of national ID cards could be double or even triple the £40 claimed by Home Secretary David Blunkett in a leaked cabinet document.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:13 PM Mon 7 Jul 2003 Categories: ID Cards , Privacy , Silicon.com
Keeping 1984 in the past - The Guardian

'In the London of 2003, security cameras have become omnipresent. The UK is thought to be one of the most surveilled countries in the world. The same is true in most urban areas: the Home Office has part-funded 684 schemes for cities and towns since 1999, involving anything from half a dozen to hundreds of cameras. Office buildings, retailers and other arms of the state have installed many thousands more. The total is likely to be hundreds of thousands.' link

Posted by SteveC at 05:19 PM Mon 23 Jun 2003 Categories: Privacy , The Guardian
Bosses to be prosecuted for e-mail 'snooping' - The Times

'Employers could face prosecution if they snoop on workers' emails and telephone calls without their knowledge, the Government warned today.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:53 PM Wed 11 Jun 2003 Categories: Cybercrime , Privacy , The Times
GCHQ moves in to the doughnut - The Guardian

'A new codeword is on everyone's lips in the land of spies. Doughnut. The first of more than 4,000 staff working in Britain's most secretive establishment are preparing to move into a building given that name, in the final stage of what amounts to a cultural revolution in the world of espionage.' link

Posted by SteveC at 11:23 AM Tue 10 Jun 2003 Categories: Privacy , The Guardian
Spooks 'to share terror secrets' - BBC

'The UK's latest move in the fight against terrorism is a secret project to bring together intelligence data from the UK's security agencies, say reports.' link

Posted by SteveC at 01:33 PM Thu 29 May 2003 Categories: BBC , Data retention , Privacy
Government snoop dogs get dogged - VNUNET

Privacy International is calling for UK consumers to take part in a 'Know your Data' campaign after warning that police and other agencies made hundreds of thousands of requests for data about individuals this year. link

Posted by SteveC at 12:57 PM Wed 21 May 2003 Categories: Privacy , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , VNUNET
Big Brother 'watches more of us every year' - The Telegraph

Police and government officials are demanding access to personal data on telephone calls and internet use of more than one million people every year, according to figures released yesterday. link

Posted by SteveC at 12:54 PM Wed 21 May 2003 Categories: Privacy , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , The Telegraph
Extent of UK snooping revealed - BBC

Officials in the UK are routinely demanding huge quantities of information about what people do online and who they call, say privacy experts. link

Posted by SteveC at 01:19 PM Fri 16 May 2003 Categories: BBC , Privacy
IT managers fear for their servers - VNUNET

'As the annual number of public sector requests for communications data begins to emerge, IT managers have expressed concerns that police could seize their servers.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:57 PM Fri 16 May 2003 Categories: Privacy , VNUNET
Want to know what happens to your personal data? - Silicon.com

'Privacy International is urging the UK public to contact their communications operators to find out how much data is being stored about them. This move, the organisation believes, should help to establish how much information is kept in customer records and could also encourage greater respect for privacy.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:53 PM Fri 16 May 2003 Categories: Privacy , Silicon.com
Whistle blown over extent of UK data seizures - ZDNET

'Around one billion pieces of personal data are handed over to the police and other official bodies each year by communications companies, privacy advocates have calculated' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:50 PM Fri 16 May 2003 Categories: Privacy , ZDNET
Most stupid security measure: winners - Awards

Privacy International today announced the results of its competition to find the worlds most pointless, intrusive and egregious security measures. The competition, launched in February, attracted almost 5,000 nominations from 35 countries. While the air security sector dominated the competition, nominations arose from almost all areas of private and public sector activity. The winners include JFK Airport, T-Mobile (UK), Michigan Correctional facilities and the Australian Government. link

Posted by SteveC at 03:37 PM Wed 9 Apr 2003 Categories: Awards , Privacy
It's here, it's now: Big Brother's reign has begun - The Telegraph

'Of all the weapons in the armoury of New Labour, there is nothing more terrifying than Excalibur, the party's computer database. Tories speak of it in hushed, broken tones, as the woad-painted tribes must once have discussed the tortoise technique of the legions.' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:36 PM Thu 13 Jun 2002 Categories: Privacy , The Telegraph
The net closes on civil liberties - The Guardian

'My parents and I came to the UK as refugees from Poland in 1969. In Poland, our phone was tapped, letters were opened, movements monitored and associations carefully noted and used against us. After 33 years in a country I have grown to love, it is surprising that the government wants to read my emails, monitor my phone calls, work out my movements, who I associate with and how I spend my money' link

Posted by SteveC at 06:46 PM Thu 13 Jun 2002 Categories: Human Rights , Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
Government plans snooping expansion - VNUNET

'The government is planning a massive extension of the number of public bodies that can snoop on details of telephone calls, email and web traffic.' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:25 PM Wed 12 Jun 2002 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
CIVIL RIGHTS FURY OVER E-MAIL ACCESS - The Mirror

'CIVIL rights groups yesterday blasted moves to give dozens of Government bodies sweeping new powers to snoop on our email and telephone records.' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:23 PM Wed 12 Jun 2002 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Mirror
New powers put privacy laws to the test - ZDNET

'The government's move to give more agencies access to personal Internet and telecoms information will put a strain on the Data Protection Act and other institutions, say critics' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:21 PM Wed 12 Jun 2002 Categories: Human Rights , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , ZDNET
UK pushes boundaries of citizen surveillance - The Guardian

'The data retention powers to be handed to a wide range of UK government agencies will exceed those available anywhere else in the world, writes Neil McIntosh' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:02 PM Wed 12 Jun 2002 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Stop the snoopers - The Guardian

'The decision of the government to intrude upon our private communications (Government sweeps aside privacy rights, June 11) is reason enough for this Labour party member to review his membership.' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:00 PM Wed 12 Jun 2002 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Councils granted all-seeing powers - The Times

'SEVEN government departments and all local councils will be able to access details of everyone's telephone and internet records under a sweeping expansion of Big Brother powers planned by David Blunkett.' link

Posted by SteveC at 06:58 PM Wed 12 Jun 2002 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Times
Government sweeps aside privacy rights - The Guardian

'Ministers were last night accused of conducting a systematic campaign to undermine the right to privacy as it emerged that a host of government departments, local councils and quangos are to be given the power to demand the communications records of every British telephone and internet user.' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:45 PM Tue 11 Jun 2002 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
'Massive abuse' of privacy feared - BBC

'Plans to increase the number of organisations that can look at records of what you do online could lead to widespread abuse of personal information, warn experts.' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:39 PM Tue 11 Jun 2002 Categories: BBC , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
Snoops a go-go: UK gov goes mad on privacy invasion - The Register

'The UK government intends to implement sweeping extensions to the snooping powers of official bodies before its controversial Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act (RIPA) even comes into force. RIPA was bludgeoned through Parliament two years ago in the face of heavy opposition, and is to come into force later this year.' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:27 PM Tue 11 Jun 2002 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Register
UK plans to extend snooping powers - NewScientist

'The UK government has revealed plans to extend the range of officials allowed to snoop on people by accessing their email and phone records. Privacy campaigners say they are "appalled".' link

Posted by SteveC at 06:55 PM Tue 11 Jun 2002 Categories: NewScientist , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
Civil liberties groups attack 'snooper's charter' - ePolitix

'MPs will next week debate moves to allow government departments, agencies and local councils gain access to private emails and telephone records. The move, dubbed a "snooper's charter" by critics, will give new powers to departments including the department of the environment, the Home Office and the DTI.' link

Posted by SteveC at 06:52 PM Tue 11 Jun 2002 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , ePolitix
Police to spy on all emails - The Observer

'Millions of personal emails, other internet information and telephone records are to be made accessible to the police and intelligence services in a move that has been denounced by critics as one of the most wide-ranging extensions of state power over private information.' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:47 PM Sun 9 Jun 2002 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Observer
A new blow to our privacy - The Guardian

'Last week's unexpected vote by the European Parliament to give sweeping powers to EU governments to monitor internet, phone and email traffic has angered civil liberties groups everywhere. It will allow governments to force phone and internet companies to keep detailed records of customers' web, phone and email usage for a long time.' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:49 PM Thu 6 Jun 2002 Categories: Privacy , The Guardian
Questions over net snooping centre - BBC

'A controversial internet snooping centre to be opened in the summer by the UK Government could cause more problems than it solves, experts say.' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:43 PM Thu 6 Jun 2002 Categories: BBC , Privacy
Email snooping bill enrages privacy groups - Silicon.com

'Privacy groups are up in arms over European laws concerning electronic data retention, spam and cookies which were passed today.' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:33 PM Thu 30 May 2002 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Silicon.com
Who's looking at your notes? - Economist.com

'AS PART of the reform of the National Health Service (NHS), the government has promised a more user-friendly system ?where the patient is in the driving seat?. Key to this is informed consent, giving patients more say in their dealings with the NHS. But a new piece of legislation, which comes into force on June 1st, has some worried that the government is taking back the wheel.' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:15 PM Thu 30 May 2002 Categories: Economist.com , Patient Records , Privacy
Snooping Bill: It's back and this time it's personal - Silicon.com

'Blanket surveillance of communications data could become a reality as the European Parliament votes on a key amendment to telecommunications law on Thursday.' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:30 PM Wed 29 May 2002 Categories: Human Rights , Privacy , Silicon.com
European 'spying' laws savaged - BBC

'Civil liberty groups have condemned a European Parliament decision to let law enforcers spy on phone and net users.' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:41 PM Mon 20 May 2002 Categories: BBC , Privacy
[RIP is] the most pernicious invasion of privacy ever imposed by a democratic state - The Times


No Hiding Place - Bryan Appleyard
[RIP is] the most pernicious invasion of privacy ever imposed by a democratic state - Anthony Barnett (founding director of Charter 88)

Posted by SteveC at 12:55 PM Sun 15 Apr 2001 Categories: Privacy , The Times
RMS RIP comments - The Register

Free software would have prevented foot and mouth, BSE, Hatfield
rail crash - RMS
- Pausing
only for the obligatory swipe at the UK Government, the Regulation of
Investigatory Powers Act and the Private Security Industry Bill (and tipping
his hat to FIPR's Caspar Bowden, also in the audience) Stallman went on a
gentle meander through the history of copyright, ending at the present day
when the media companies own most copyrights and also (he alleges) own the politicians who make the laws that maintain the system.

Posted by SteveC at 01:08 PM Fri 6 Apr 2001 Categories: Privacy , The Register
In sight of the law - The Guardian

'The police and local authorities are using technology to keep a close watch on our every move. SA Mathieson looks behind the scenes' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:22 PM Thu 1 Mar 2001 Categories: Privacy , Surveillance & Security , The Guardian
Privacy Battle Brews in England - Wired News

'Clean up your hard drive and mind your manners if you live in or are traveling to the United Kingdom. Police there may soon be able to copy and store the contents of computers, collect and warehouse samples of human DNA and fine people for misdemeanors without having to arrest them first.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:44 PM Tue 23 Jan 2001 Categories: Privacy , Surveillance & Security , Wired News
Firms 'should allow personal e-mails' - BBC

'TUC general secretary John Monks said recent regulations, giving employers sweeping powers to monitor their workers' e-mails and internet activity, had left many people worried that managers might be "snooping" on their personal e-mails.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:43 PM Sun 17 Dec 2000 Categories: BBC , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
Email snooping row kicks off again - The Register

'The code contradicts the government's official line on email monitoring, stating that emails marked personal or private should be off-bounds to employers. She also says staff should be made aware when they are being watched. Any monitoring outside these two conditions should be carried out only in order to detect or prevent a crime. In contrast, the government says employers should have "routine access" to staff emails and phone conversations.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:51 PM Tue 28 Nov 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Register
Ex-Nato chief launches attack on RIP Act - VNUNET

'A former Nato director has made a stinging attack on the UK government over its cyber snooping law.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:27 PM Wed 1 Nov 2000 Categories: Cybercrime , Privacy , VNUNET
Europe to investigate legality of RIP - The Register

'Britain's big brother email snooping law - RIP - could be in breach of European privacy legislation.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:25 PM Fri 27 Oct 2000 Categories: Human Rights , Privacy , The Register
Cautious welcome for e-snoop law - BBC

'New rules giving employers sweeping powers to monitor workers' e-mails and internet activity have received a cautious welcome in Scotland.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:23 PM Tue 24 Oct 2000 Categories: BBC , Privacy
Employers gain e-snoop powers - BBC

'New regulations giving employers sweeping powers to monitor their workers' e-mails and internet activity come into force in the UK on Tuesday.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:18 PM Tue 24 Oct 2000 Categories: BBC , Human Rights , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
Bosses join email snooping scrum - The Register

'The CBI has slammed the proposed Data Protection Commission's (DPC) draft code of practice on interception of emails and phone calls. The code is currently based on what were draft regulations and so is out of date, it says.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:15 PM Tue 17 Oct 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , Human Rights , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Register
Protecting privacy and monitoring e-mail - BBC

'Companies may start curbing staff surfing in the wake of Government guidelines that give them the right to spy on employees using the phone or e-mail, warn lawyers.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:09 PM Thu 5 Oct 2000 Categories: BBC , Human Rights , Privacy
U.K. employers win powers to snoop on workers - CNN

'LONDON (Reuters) -- Unions and Internet campaigners reacted angrily Wednesday to new British laws that they say will let unscrupulous employers snoop on personal phone calls and e-mail messages by their staff.' link

Posted by SteveC at 11:56 AM Wed 4 Oct 2000 Categories: CNN , Human Rights , Privacy
U.K. Bosses Get Access To Staff E-mail - TechWeb

'British privacy activists are challenging new rules that will let employers read their staff's e-mail without seeking permission first.' link

Posted by SteveC at 11:55 AM Wed 4 Oct 2000 Categories: Human Rights , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , TechWeb
The RIP Act - The Guardian

'The RIP Act, which comes into force today, allows the government to intercept online communications. Julian Glover and Patrick Barkham examine the controversy surrounding the new act and the implications for privacy and e-commerce' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:27 PM Sun 24 Sep 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , Privacy , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
All-seeing society - The Guardian

'With the nation fixated on television's parody of George Orwell's dystopic vision of the future, most of us have failed to notice the real Big Brother sneaking through the floorboards into the back of our screens. On July 28, while many of us were settling down with a bag of crisps to see whether Nasty Nick had been rumbled, the Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Act was passed.' link

Posted by SteveC at 01:33 PM Mon 11 Sep 2000 Categories: Cybercrime , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
US users bite back at snooping law - VNUNET

'Against this background it's not too surprising what Americans think of their government's equivalent to the sealed boxes that UK security services can install at ISPs under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act. As in, not much.' link

Posted by SteveC at 01:30 PM Tue 5 Sep 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
Spy in your pocket - BBC

'The next generation of mobile phones will make it much easier for the police to carry out covert surveillance of citizens, say civil liberty campaigners.' link

Posted by SteveC at 01:15 PM Mon 14 Aug 2000 Categories: BBC , Privacy
The spy in your server - The Guardian

'Governments all over the world have suddenly become embroiled in controversy about electronic surveillance of the internet. In the United States, a political storm has arisen over a new FBI internet tapping system codenamed Carnivore. In Britain, the Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Act has just extended telephone-tapping powers to cover internet service providers (ISPs), and allows the government to arrange indiscriminate tapping or email interception for foreign police forces and security agencies.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:41 PM Thu 10 Aug 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
To Each His Own? - TIME

'The answer's not clear when it comes to personal data. Ideas differ about how much control we need' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:31 PM Mon 31 Jul 2000 Categories: Data retention , Privacy , TIME
'I arrest you for emailing' - The Guardian

'On Friday the Queen graciously gave her assent to the Regulation of Investigatory Powers bill after it was fast-tracked through parliament with the agreement of the two main parties. So the RIP bill is now the RIP Act, yet another piece of legislation which will prevent journalists from operating freely in the public interest.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:29 PM Mon 31 Jul 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Every move you make, every breath you take... - The Observer

'From the moment you wake up tomorrow, nearly every movement you make will be tracked by somebody, somewhere. Walk to your car, turn on your computer at work, visit the local supermarket - all will be noted by cameras or databases deep in the bowels of corporate HQs and within shadowy government agencies.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:27 PM Sun 30 Jul 2000 Categories: Privacy , The Observer
U.K. e-mail snooping bill passed - CNN

'LONDON (IDG) -- The surveillance bill granting the U.K. government sweeping powers to access e-mail and other encrypted Internet communications passed its final vote in the House of Commons on Wednesday and is set to become law on October 5.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:22 PM Fri 28 Jul 2000 Categories: CNN , Cost to industry , Cybercrime , Human Rights , Privacy
UN report scorns UK human rights record - The Guardian

'A devastating United Nations report has condemned the UK's human rights record and called for sweeping reforms to the security services, an end to gagging orders and protection for journalists who expose wrongdoing inside MI5 and MI6.' link

Posted by SteveC at 05:22 PM Thu 20 Jul 2000 Categories: Human Rights , Privacy , Reports/Equiries , The Guardian
RIP to civil liberties and the e-business revolution - The Observer

'On Thursday, the British Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Bill completed its passage through the Lords, on its way to the Statute Book in October. Although their Lordships have done some sterling work in Committee, the Bill that now returns to the Lower House preserves intact its sinister essence as a spooks' charter.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:59 PM Sun 16 Jul 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , Privacy , The Observer
Minister slams RIP objections as 'ill founded' - The Register

'Home Office Minister Charles Clarke has labelled concerns over the Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) bill from an alliance of 50 UK organisations "ill founded".' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:39 PM Wed 12 Jul 2000 Categories: Privacy , The Register
'Snooping' bill protests stepped up - BBC

'Opponents of the government's "snooping" bill are keeping up the pressure to amend or scrap the controversial legislation.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:37 PM Wed 12 Jul 2000 Categories: BBC , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
UK groups urge Lords to scrap RIP Bill - VNUNET

'An alliance of more than 50 UK organisations has called on the House of Lords to scrap the controversial Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:35 PM Wed 12 Jul 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
Peers examine email tapping - BBC

'The government's bill to update security laws in the wake of the internet revolution will continue its bumpy ride through Parliament on Monday.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:33 PM Mon 19 Jun 2000 Categories: BBC , Cost to industry , Privacy
Straw braced for defeat over RIP bill - The Guardian

'The beleaguered Home Office, already facing criticism over its handling of asylum seekers and football hooligans, is also bracing itself for the prospect of a swath of defeats over the regulation of the internet.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:30 PM Mon 19 Jun 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
'Doing nothing is just not an option' - The Guardian

'Opponents of the new controls are elitist, Thatcherite and afraid of democracy' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:22 PM Sun 18 Jun 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
Take a tip m'lord - save cookie talk for teatime - The Observer

'...the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill winds its grisly way through the Upper House. The Bill is being shepherded through by a chap called Lord Bassam of Brighton, aided and abetted by a cove named Bach. Neither of them appears to know anything about the technology of the internet, though M'lord Bach seems to rely heavily on the advice of a Baroness Thornton, who in real life is Mrs John Carr, and thus the spouse of a well-known campaigner against child pornography on the internet. ' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:17 PM Sun 18 Jun 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , The Observer
Net watchdog Bill faces axe - The Observer

'Jack Straw's much criticised Bill to regulate the freedom of the internet is facing disaster in the Lords as critics organise a guerrilla campaign against the Government.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:11 PM Sun 18 Jun 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , Privacy , The Observer
Our zero privacy - The Observer

'What ever you do where ever you go, they're watching you. And now they'll be reading your emails too' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:07 PM Sun 18 Jun 2000 Categories: Privacy , The Observer
Offshore haven - The Guardian

'The government last night poured cold water on a plan by group of entrepreneurs to establish a "data haven" on a rusting iron fortress in the North Sea in an attempt to circumvent new anti-cryptography laws.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:00 PM Tue 6 Jun 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
BCC attacks Straw 'licence to snoop' - The Guardian

'Powers allowing Scotland Yard, MI5 and other state agencies to intercept all internet and email communications involve "a serious potential invasion of commercial privacy" and ought to be radically redrafted, the British Chambers of Commerce said yesterday' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:53 PM Tue 6 Jun 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , Privacy , The Guardian
Government tapping of phone calls between UK and Ireland challenged - The Guardian

'The government is being taken to the European human rights court over allegations that the security and intelligence agencies have been engaged in the wholesale tapping of telephone conversations between Britain and Ireland.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:37 PM Wed 31 May 2000 Categories: Privacy , The Guardian
Private means - The Guardian

'Our rulers invite us to believe that our safety is their over-riding consideration and that they therefore fight a lonely fight, day in, day out, against crime, drugs and a host of other menaces, such as people from other countries wanting to live here. They tell us that they can and will beat these things but that it will need eternal vigilance on their part and complete subordination on ours. For these threats to be overcome, the state must know everything about us and we must know nothing about the state. And if we're not happy with the relationship, it can only be supposed either that we have no regard for the safety of our children, or that we are up to no good ourselves.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:31 PM Sat 27 May 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Watching while you surf - BBC

'The UK is leading the world when it comes to high-tech spying on its citizens, say civil liberty and privacy groups.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:24 PM Thu 25 May 2000 Categories: BBC , Privacy , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
All Kafka'd up - NUJ

'Let's get straight to a fable showing how the Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Bill 2000 could affect you. It's conveniently difficult to write a who-what-when intro about one of the most heavily obfuscated pieces of legislation the Journalist has had the misfortune to encounter. The Home Office says its purpose is to regulate email interception, human surveillance of suspects, and the like. But do read on...' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:20 PM Wed 24 May 2000 Categories: NUJ , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
Four threats to the public's right to know - The Guardian

'The freedom of information bill, now going through parliament, gives fewer rights to official information than those enjoyed by citizens of the US, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the Irish Republic. In some respects, the rights are weaker than those under the last Tory government's open government code.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:05 PM Mon 22 May 2000 Categories: Freedom of Information , Privacy , The Guardian
New Internet spy agency to be set up in Britain - WSWS.org

'The British Labour government is planning to set up a new spy centre that can track all email and Internet communication, including encrypted messages.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:56 PM Thu 18 May 2000 Categories: Privacy , WSWS.org
New Internet spy agency to be set up in Britain - WSWS.org

'The Government Technical Assistance Centre (GTAC) is to be built at a cost of billions of dollars as part of a concretisation of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill (RIP) currently going through parliament. The RIP designates Internet Service Providers (ISPs) as "public telecommunications systems". As such they are required to give access to detailed information about Internet traffic upon the demand of the Home Secretary, a judge or even a senior police officer. In introducing the legislation Home Secretary Jack Straw reserved the right to demand the placing of specific devices to monitor ISP traffic.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:59 PM Thu 18 May 2000 Categories: Cybercrime , Privacy , WSWS.org
Computer crime plan 'bad for business' - BBC

'Controversial proposals to control the interception of e-mail and other communications return to the UK Parliament on Monday, having previously been described appalling and objectionable.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:45 PM Mon 8 May 2000 Categories: BBC , Cost to industry , Cybercrime , Privacy
UK moving to open all (e-)mail - Christian Science Monitor

'By the end of this year, any e-mail to or from a friend or business in England can be read by a British intelligence agent at MI5 headquarters in London.'

Posted by SteveC at 03:38 PM Fri 5 May 2000 Categories: Christian Science Monitor , Cybercrime , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
Spider in the web - The Guardian

'As far as the internet goes, America is the land of the free. But Britain certainly isn't
Free speech on the net: special report' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:19 PM Wed 3 May 2000 Categories: Cybercrime , Privacy , The Guardian
MI5's email snoops - The Guardian

'Yes, MI5 is building a new surveillance centre that will enable it to monitor all British emails and internet transactions. But fear not: that prize ass Tom King MP, outgoing chairman of the parliamentary intelligence committee, reassures us that all warrants for email-tapping will be scrutinised by Lord Nolan, the commissioner for the interception of communications.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:16 PM Wed 3 May 2000 Categories: Cybercrime , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Spies Like Us - The Guardian

'The U.S. government says it doesn’t do it. Russia does it, which surprises no one. Now Great Britain wants to spy on its own citizens’ e-mails. A new British bill would enable law enforcement officials to watch every byte of e-mail as it passes through the country’s networks, in real time. The government’s Home Office says the new system is necessary to catch criminals who do their business online.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:13 PM Wed 3 May 2000 Categories: Cybercrime , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Government to build new email and surfing surveillance centre - ZDNET

'A new centre for monitoring email and Internet communications is to be built by NCIS (National Criminal Intelligence Service) at the cost of £25m, the government said Tuesday.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:09 PM Tue 2 May 2000 Categories: Cybercrime , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , ZDNET
U.K. plan to open Internet spy center draws criticism - CNN

'(CNN) -- The United Kingdom Home Office is responding to the concerns of civil liberties groups over a government plan to open a facility designed to intercept and monitor Internet traffic, including e-mail and encrypted messages.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:06 PM Mon 1 May 2000 Categories: CNN , Cybercrime , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
Spy centre to spread its web - BBC

'The government is to build a £25m spy centre to monitor criminal gangs through their use of the internet. The Government Technical Assistance Centre (GTAC) is likely to be used to unscramble coded internet messages, tap phones and intercept e-mails.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:03 PM Mon 1 May 2000 Categories: BBC , Cybercrime , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
Computer cloaks and digital daggers - BBC

'The announcement that the government is to spend £25m on a new internet surveillance centre capable of tracking and intercepting electronic communications is clear evidence that a new era of digital spying has been ushered in.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:55 PM Sun 30 Apr 2000 Categories: BBC , Cybercrime , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
UK Building Eavesdropping Infrastructure - Slashdot

'This Sunday Times story about a new office under MI5 scheduled to open later this year with the innocuous name of "Government Technical Assistance Centre" to oversee the content of e-mail sent by and to Britons ought to give pause to anyone interested in online privacy. Though governments will always be several steps behind determined privacy seekers, this bodes ill for anyone who'd prefer to keep the contents of their e-mail even nominally secret. "The security service and the police will still need Home Office permission to search for e-mails and internet traffic, but they can apply for general warrants that would enable them to intercept communications for a company or an organisation," says the article. How comforting.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:59 PM Sat 29 Apr 2000 Categories: Cybercrime , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Slashdot
Delays hit email privacy law - VNUNET

'A new law that gives police the power to intercept emails could be delayed, due to disputes in Parliament about whether or not net users should have to prove their innocence.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:15 PM Wed 26 Apr 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
Jack Straw wants the keys to your office. Don't let him in ... - The Observer

'Big mistake. It's becoming clear that Straw & Co have no idea of the nightmare they are creating. Their screwball Bill is the product of a shambles in Whitehall over online regulation.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:41 PM Sun 16 Apr 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Observer
Echelon in Holland - TELEPOLIS

'The Dutch Intelligence Agency BVD is getting new powers. Among other things, the powers to intercept communications will be extended. The agency is authorized, if the government gets its way, to intercept satellite communications at random and search the intercepted traffic by keywords. Also, the BVD gets a new intelligence task: the gathering of economical information. Holland goes Echelon, it seems.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:37 PM Tue 11 Apr 2000 Categories: Privacy , TELEPOLIS
New law opens up private data to MI5 - VNUNET

'Users attending the fifth Scrambling for Safety conference last week were in for a shock when they gathered in London to debate the UK government's draft legislation on bugging communications.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:29 AM Fri 31 Mar 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
MI5 bugging exempt from privacy act - The Guardian

'Covert surveillance by MI5, MI6 and the police, including tapping phones and bugging homes, will be exempt from challenge under a new right to privacy contained in the Human Rights Act, it has emerged.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:25 AM Mon 27 Mar 2000 Categories: Human Rights , Privacy , The Guardian
The key to security (Letter from Charles Clarke) - The Guardian

The regulation of investigatory powers RIP bill updates vital powers for a changing technological world in a way consistent with the requirements of the European convention on human rights (Leader, March 7). These powers will be subject to safeguards and external supervision more tightly drawn than ever before. link

Posted by SteveC at 03:20 PM Fri 10 Mar 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
Big Brother delves into your inbox - BBC

'Student Julie Ann Davies was "astonished" when she was arrested over her links with former MI5 spy David Shayler, because she'd had no idea she was under police investigation. It is speculated that she had been the subject of a covert operation, and that police or MI5 had been intercepting her e-mails for some time, entirely without her knowledge.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:14 PM Wed 8 Mar 2000 Categories: BBC , Human Rights , Privacy
RIP for basic liberties - The Guardian

'Michael Gapes, Labour MP for Ilford South, told the Commons yesterday how his father as a postman would have to deliver letters to a certain place where they were opened then resealed before continuing their journey to the recipient's house. He was speaking during the second reading of the controversial regulation of investigatory powers (RIP) bill. Everyone knows that interception takes place and that it is the duty of the authorities to hunt down drug-pushers, paedophiles and money-launderers by all legal means. The RIP bill still fails to strike the right balance between an individual's right to privacy and the state's duty to track down criminals. Even Jack Straw at his most avuncular could not explain why the right to authorise interception should rest with him (and his less avuncular successors) rather than with judges as in many other countries.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:06 PM Tue 7 Mar 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
Computer crime plans attacked - BBC

'Laws proposed by the UK Government to enable the interception of electronic communications in the battle against organised crime have been criticised as appalling and objectionable.The Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill debate was opened by the Home Secretary Jack Straw who said law enforcement agencies worldwide were worried about the criminal use of encryption to send coded electronic messages. He said UK and the US was putting in place a package of measures to tackle the problem.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:05 PM Tue 7 Mar 2000 Categories: BBC , Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III)
Editorial comment: Spies in the web - Financial Times

'Big Brother only had television cameras to spy into our living rooms. Today's governments have computers, with power far beyond anything imagined by George Orwell in his chilling novel 1984. But to make best use of their surveillance of internet data, they need to have the keys to the encryption systems now routinely used to defend privacy. Yesterday Jack Straw introduced a bill in Britain's House of (Commons that would give the authorities more intrusive powers than in any other western democracy.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:08 PM Mon 6 Mar 2000 Categories: Financial Times , Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III)
NTK lead - NTK

'On Monday, the REGULATION OF INVESTIGATORY POWERS BILL will get its second reading in the Commons. Then it goes to committee, then it becomes law, and then you'll never hear from it again, because talking about most of its powers will get you five years in prison. So, when the police ask your ISP to put a tap on your mail, you won't hear about it. When your local trades and standards officer decides to take a look at your browser log for the last month, you won't hear about it. And when they come and get your private encryption key so that can read your friend's mails, you won't be able to tell your friend - or us - that it happened. Hell, you won't even be able to change your key if that might give us a clue.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:56 PM Fri 3 Mar 2000 Categories: NTK , Privacy , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
Government snooping will cost taxpayers millions - ZDNET

'Plans to seize encryption keys from crime suspects will leave them vulnerable to theft and misuse. Government snooping plans will cost the taxpayer "hundreds of millions" of pounds, according to a report published on Monday.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:50 PM Wed 1 Mar 2000 Categories: FIPR releases , Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , ZDNET
Encryption at the mercy of the law - VNUNET

'The Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Bill, which allows police to intercept network data, sparked a storm of controversy when it was published by the UK government. The Bill, published on 10 February, updates legislation on the monitoring and interception of public and private communications and data by law enforcement agencies. It sets out rules and regulations for wire-tapping phones and data lines within ISP infrastructure, and the decoding of privately encrypted data.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:47 PM Mon 28 Feb 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
Irish, UK Crypto Regs Far Apart - Wired News

'DUBLIN, Ireland -- Britain is likely to become the first country in the world to make imprisonment a possible consequence of refusing to surrender, or even losing, one's private encryption keys. At the same time, neighboring Ireland is preparing legislation that would make it the first country to prohibit law enforcement from forcing encryption users to hand over their private keys.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:42 PM Wed 16 Feb 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Wired News
Bullies, teenagers and Net giants - ZDNET

'Known as RIP to its friends (it has few) and its enemies (it has many), the bill would benefit from taking advice from eighties Indie band Orange Jucie. "Rip it up and start again" would definitely be the best thing for it. While privacy advocates question why the government needs the ability to intercept email, Human Rights campaigners point out that the bill breaks the European Convention of Human Rights. It reverses the burden of proof (if you are suspected of owning a decryption key, you are now guilty until proven innocent). And finally the government has incensed Internet service providers who will have to shell out millions to get interception equipment installed.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:39 PM Mon 14 Feb 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , ZDNET