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Archives for 'The Guardian' category.

blah - The Guardian

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Posted by SteveC at 03:25 PM Tue 25 Nov 2003 Categories: The Guardian
Image problem - The Guardian

'David Blunkett's plan for a national ID card has sparked a furious row. But will it work? And how? SA Mathieson investigates' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:31 PM Thu 20 Nov 2003 Categories: ID Cards , Surveillance & Security News , The Guardian
ID cards may cut queues but learn lessons of history, warn Europeans - The Guardian

'The words "papers please" have terrible echoes of Europe's most repressive history. The rounding up of Jews, the oppression of migrant workers, and the removal of political undesirables have all been made easier by efficient identity controls.' link

Posted by SteveC at 10:53 AM Sat 15 Nov 2003 Categories: ID Cards , Surveillance & Security News , The Guardian
The eyes have it - The Guardian

'There are few things more risky in politics than admitting you have changed your mind about a policy you have always vehemently opposed. If you have recently become a minister as well, you can expect the sneers to come thick and fast that your principles have been squashed under the weight of the red box.'link

Posted by SteveC at 10:33 PM Wed 12 Nov 2003 Categories: ID Cards , Surveillance & Security News , The Guardian
What will it mean for me? - The Guardian

'When you renew your passport or driving licence in four years time you won't just have to fill in a countersigned form and provide a recent photograph. Instead you will find you will also have to go to your nearest post office or registry office and have your fingerprints "taken" electronically and your eyes scanned so that the unique pattern of your iris can be stored on a new electronic database.' link

Posted by SteveC at 10:01 PM Wed 12 Nov 2003 Categories: ID Cards , Surveillance & Security News , The Guardian
10,000 to test eye scan and fingerprint scheme - The Guardian

'The electronic "biometric" eye scans and fingerprints that lie at the heart of the new national identity card scheme are to be tested by 10,000 volunteers in a six month Home Office trial starting in the next few weeks.' link

Posted by SteveC at 09:58 PM Wed 12 Nov 2003 Categories: ID Cards , Surveillance & Security News , The Guardian
ID cards are on the way - The Guardian

'Millions of people in Britain will start receiving their compulsory national identity cards in only four years time under the detailed plans unveiled by the home secretary, David Blunkett, yesterday.' link

Posted by SteveC at 09:55 PM Wed 12 Nov 2003 Categories: ID Cards , Surveillance & Security News , The Guardian
Passport to next generation security - The Guardian

'he cabinet's decision yesterday to "proceed by incremental steps to build a base for a compulsory national identity card scheme" does little more than acknowledge that Britain is already well down that road without the need for new legislation.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:06 PM Fri 7 Nov 2003 Categories: ID Cards , Surveillance & Security News , The Guardian
'Bloodbath' at ID cards meeting - The Guardian

'The cabinet may be forced to take a political gamble today by agreeing to include a draft bill for identity cards in the Queen's speech after an "acrimonious" committee meeting yesterday.' link

Posted by SteveC at 11:46 AM Thu 6 Nov 2003 Categories: ID Cards , Surveillance & Security News , The Guardian
Child protection scheme in disarray - The Guardian

'The government's plans to set up a database on every child in England to avoid a repetition of the circumstances leading to the murder of Victoria Climbié are in disarray because of inaccuracies in local records and data protection problems, it has emerged.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:51 AM Fri 24 Oct 2003 Categories: ID Cards , Surveillance & Security News , The Guardian
Driving 10-year EU licence 'to cut fraud' - The Guardian

'New UK driving licences will no longer be valid until the age of 70 and will have to be renewed every 10 years under proposals for a standardised EU licence approved yesterday.' link

Posted by SteveC at 11:35 AM Thu 23 Oct 2003 Categories: ID Cards , Surveillance & Security News , The Guardian
Darling joins cabinet opponents of ID card - The Guardian

'Tony Blair's hopes of winning cabinet support for identity cards have been dealt a further blow after Alistair Darling, the transport secretary, submitted a five-page cabinet letter opposing their introduction.' link

Posted by SteveC at 11:33 AM Thu 23 Oct 2003 Categories: ID Cards , Surveillance & Security News , The Guardian
Child ID numbers to help fight abuse - The Guardian

'Identity numbers for children would be part of a tracking system to keep tabs on England's 11 million children. Each child would have a file including the name, address, date of birth, school and GP. If the child came to the attention of agencies such as education welfare, social services or police, the file would carry a flag giving contact details for the lead professional in charge of the case.' link

Posted by SteveC at 10:58 AM Fri 17 Oct 2003 Categories: ID Cards , Surveillance & Security News , The Guardian
Secret go-ahead for ID card database - The Guardian

'The cabinet has secretly given the go-ahead to the chancellor, Gordon Brown, to set up Britain's first national population computer database that is the foundation stone for a compulsory identity card scheme.' link

Posted by SteveC at 05:29 PM Tue 30 Sep 2003 Categories: ID Cards , Privacy , The Guardian
Identity politics - The Guardian

'David Blunkett has long considered national identity cards as the answer. In the home secretary's mind, it is just that the British public has yet to ask the question. There is good reason for this: voters are reluctant to let government keep tabs on them and do not trust ministers to protect their privacy. History also points in the opposite direction to Mr Blunkett's hunches. Compulsory identity cards have been used during two world wars - but were dropped in peacetime. The home secretary appears undeterred.' link

Posted by SteveC at 09:17 AM Tue 23 Sep 2003 Categories: ID Cards , Privacy , The Guardian
Cabinet split delays ID cards plan - The Guardian

'The home secretary, David Blunkett's plans to introduce a national scheme of identity cards have been held up by objections from leading cabinet members, including Peter Hain, the leader of the Commons, Patricia Hewitt, the trade secretary, and Charles Clarke, the education secretary.' link

Posted by SteveC at 08:55 AM Thu 18 Sep 2003 Categories: ID Cards , The Guardian
Blunkett revives plan to let agencies trawl phone and net users' records - The Guardian

'Ministers are to press ahead with plans to ensure that communications companies retain the records of every telephone, internet and email user, in the face of determined opposition from industry and civil liberties groups.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:16 PM Mon 15 Sep 2003 Categories: RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2) , The Guardian
Blunkett fights on to save his ID card - The Guardian

'He candidly told the Commons home affairs select committee in a progress report that the cabinet was split down the middle. But he dismissed reports that John Prescott and Gordon Brown led the opposition. Mr Blunkett's strongest supporter is believed to be Tony Blair.' link

Posted by SteveC at 11:28 AM Fri 12 Sep 2003 Categories: ID Cards , Privacy , The Guardian
Police seek DNA record of everyone - The Guardian

'Senior police officers will call this week for the the national database of 2m DNA samples to be extended to everyone in the country' link

Posted by SteveC at 06:55 PM Mon 8 Sep 2003 Categories: Human Rights , Privacy , The Guardian
Runaway summer - The Guardian

'The age of closed-circuit TV is bad news for those who dream of escape' link

Posted by SteveC at 06:53 PM Mon 8 Sep 2003 Categories: CCTV , Privacy , The Guardian
ID cards to be tested in 'a small market town' - The Guardian

'The Home Office confirmed last night that a six-month trial, testing the use of new generation fingerprint and eye-scanning technology, would be completed by April to "assess customer perceptions and reactions" and estimate costs. It is believed that the trial will be carried out in an as yet unnamed small market town with a population of about 10,000.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:29 PM Wed 27 Aug 2003 Categories: ID Cards , The Guardian
ID Cards - The Guardian

'The prime minister signalled his support for ID cards "in principle", but said "huge" logistical and cost issues must be resolved first.' link

Posted by SteveC at 05:40 PM Wed 30 Jul 2003 Categories: Human Rights , Privacy , The Guardian
The plastic revolution - The Guardian

'Storing potentially vast amounts of sensitive data about every citizen in one place presents dangers. One would have to be supremely naive to believe that the information would only ever be used for benign purposes. You might trust this government, Martin, but what about the next one, or the one after that?'

Posted by SteveC at 04:10 PM Sat 12 Jul 2003 Categories: ID Cards , Privacy , The Guardian
Keeping 1984 in the past - The Guardian

'In the London of 2003, security cameras have become omnipresent. The UK is thought to be one of the most surveilled countries in the world. The same is true in most urban areas: the Home Office has part-funded 684 schemes for cities and towns since 1999, involving anything from half a dozen to hundreds of cameras. Office buildings, retailers and other arms of the state have installed many thousands more. The total is likely to be hundreds of thousands.' link

Posted by SteveC at 05:19 PM Mon 23 Jun 2003 Categories: Privacy , The Guardian
Kick this legislation out - The Guardian

'Tony Blair was given a mild drubbing by the Women's Institute last week. But that is nothing to what ought to happen this week as the RIP (regulation of investigatory powers) bill enters its committee stage in the Lords. People and industry are only just waking up to the enormity of what is proposed and their lordships would do us all a favour if they used their delaying powers to throw this disgraceful bill back to the Commons for a complete rewrite.' link

Posted by SteveC at 06:03 PM Thu 12 Jun 2003 Categories: Cost to industry , The Guardian
GCHQ moves in to the doughnut - The Guardian

'A new codeword is on everyone's lips in the land of spies. Doughnut. The first of more than 4,000 staff working in Britain's most secretive establishment are preparing to move into a building given that name, in the final stage of what amounts to a cultural revolution in the world of espionage.' link

Posted by SteveC at 11:23 AM Tue 10 Jun 2003 Categories: Privacy , The Guardian
What David did next - The Guardian

After the furore over data protection last year, SA Mathieson explores the government's designs on our movements in the digital world link

Posted by SteveC at 12:46 PM Fri 25 Apr 2003 Categories: Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2) , The Guardian
Home office attacks - The Guardian

'Civil liberties campaign group Privacy International has been attacked by the Home Office and by London mayor Ken Livingstone's staff, for what they see as unfair criticism of their records on privacy.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:48 PM Thu 27 Mar 2003 Categories: Awards , The Guardian
Tory peers move to block snoopers' bill - The Guardian

'Lord Strathcylde, the Tory leader in the Lords, is prepared to obstruct government secondary legislation to stop what is seen as an infringe ment of civil liberties. The government plans that every local authority and a number of other public bodies and quangos will have access to phone, email and internet data, though not the content of these communications.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:19 AM Thu 20 Mar 2003 Categories: Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , The Guardian
How [comms data] trapped 9/11 mastermind - The Guardian

'The electronic surveillance network Echelon played a key role in the capture of the alleged September 11 mastermind, Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, it was reported yesterday - as did a $27m (£18m) payment to an "al-Qaida foot soldier", who may be planning to relocate to Britain.' link

Posted by SteveC at 01:29 AM Fri 14 Mar 2003 Categories: The Guardian
The 'snoopers' charter' explained - The Guardian

'What is the snoopers' charter? It's a plan to give state agencies access to your telephone, internet and email records. Data would include information including who you call on your mobile phone, and where you are calling from, and to whom and when you sent emails.' link

Posted by SteveC at 08:04 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , The Guardian
New limits may allay fears on snooping - The Guardian

'The proposals won a mixed response from civil liberties groups. John Wadham, the director of Liberty, said: "The original snooper's charter proposals were appallingly excessive. We welcome much of the government plan to step back from them. But authorities accessing this data should need a warrant from a judge - that's the only truly independent safeguard that can produce public confidence."' link

Posted by SteveC at 08:01 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , The Guardian
Ministers scale down 'snooper 's charter' - The Guardian

Officials had planned to allow a vast range of public bodies - including seven Whitehall departments, local councils and 11 quangos - the right to demand access to private communications records. link

Posted by SteveC at 04:42 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , The Guardian
In praise of David Blunkett - The Guardian

'His new proposals are still flawed, but they are better than before' link

Posted by SteveC at 01:42 PM Mon 3 Mar 2003 Categories: The Guardian
Blunkett u-turn on data privacy plans - The Guardian

David Blunkett, the home secretary, has bowed to intense public concern over the privacy of electronic communications and radically redrawn plans to give a host of state agencies and local authorities the power to access telephone, internet and email records. link

Posted by SteveC at 11:32 AM Wed 26 Feb 2003 Categories: Govt. Consultations , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2) , The Guardian
FAXYOURMP.com 'instrumental in substantially altering the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act' - The Guardian

FAXYOURMP.com 'instrumental in substantially altering the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act' - FaxYourMP.com has celebrated another milestone, with figures showing its effectiveness in getting people in touch with their MPs. And it is all done by volunteers

Posted by SteveC at 05:13 PM Thu 13 Feb 2003 Categories: The Guardian
EU snooping plans dwarfed by UK laws - RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)

EU snooping plans dwarfed by UK laws - "...in Britain, we are well ahead of the rest of Europe in the data snooping race..."

Posted by SteveC at 03:44 PM Tue 20 Aug 2002 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Blunkett shelves access to data plans - The Guardian

Blunkett shelves access to data plans - "Ministers were yesterday forced into a humiliating climbdown"

Posted by SteveC at 03:50 PM Wed 19 Jun 2002 Categories: Govt. Consultations , The Guardian
The net closes on civil liberties - The Guardian

'My parents and I came to the UK as refugees from Poland in 1969. In Poland, our phone was tapped, letters were opened, movements monitored and associations carefully noted and used against us. After 33 years in a country I have grown to love, it is surprising that the government wants to read my emails, monitor my phone calls, work out my movements, who I associate with and how I spend my money' link

Posted by SteveC at 06:46 PM Thu 13 Jun 2002 Categories: Human Rights , Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
UK pushes boundaries of citizen surveillance - The Guardian

'The data retention powers to be handed to a wide range of UK government agencies will exceed those available anywhere else in the world, writes Neil McIntosh' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:02 PM Wed 12 Jun 2002 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Stop the snoopers - The Guardian

'The decision of the government to intrude upon our private communications (Government sweeps aside privacy rights, June 11) is reason enough for this Labour party member to review his membership.' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:00 PM Wed 12 Jun 2002 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Government sweeps aside privacy rights - The Guardian

'Ministers were last night accused of conducting a systematic campaign to undermine the right to privacy as it emerged that a host of government departments, local councils and quangos are to be given the power to demand the communications records of every British telephone and internet user.' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:45 PM Tue 11 Jun 2002 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
A new blow to our privacy - The Guardian

'Last week's unexpected vote by the European Parliament to give sweeping powers to EU governments to monitor internet, phone and email traffic has angered civil liberties groups everywhere. It will allow governments to force phone and internet companies to keep detailed records of customers' web, phone and email usage for a long time.' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:49 PM Thu 6 Jun 2002 Categories: Privacy , The Guardian
Cyber terror threatens UK's biggest companies - The Guardian

'Cyber-terrorists have hacked into a third of the country's big companies and public sector organisations, including government offices, causing damage ranging from infiltrating corporate bank accounts to information theft, a survey reveals today.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:36 PM Tue 3 Apr 2001 Categories: Cybercrime , Surveillance & Security News , The Guardian
Cyber terror threatens UK's biggest companies - The Guardian

Cyber terror threatens UK's biggest companies - The
CMA asked 172 of its senior personnel
... Thirty-two per cent admitted being the victim of cyber-terrorism.

Posted by SteveC at 01:20 PM Tue 3 Apr 2001 Categories: Cybercrime , The Guardian
In sight of the law - The Guardian

'The police and local authorities are using technology to keep a close watch on our every move. SA Mathieson looks behind the scenes' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:22 PM Thu 1 Mar 2001 Categories: Privacy , Surveillance & Security News , The Guardian
MoD inquiry into 'privacy breach' - The Guardian

'Ministry of Defence police have ordered an internal inquiry into allegations that its officers extracted private information stored on a mobile phone of an anti-nuclear protester, the Guardian can reveal.
[...]
A spokesman for the MoD police said the inquiry was to determine whether the information was taken in accordance with the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:55 PM Mon 19 Feb 2001 Categories: RIP Oversight (Part IV) , Surveillance & Security News , The Guardian
Unions concerned about BBC email policy - The Guardian

'The BBC is the latest firm to come under union scrutiny over its powers to open staff emails.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:34 PM Tue 9 Jan 2001 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
TUC claims firms overreact by sacking staff for lewd office emails - The Guardian

'Workers who send lewd emails around the office were being targeted unfairly by their employers, the Trades Union Congress yesterday claimed.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:31 PM Sat 6 Jan 2001 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Surveillance & Security News , The Guardian
Net tightens around the hacktivists - The Guardian

'Rocketing numbers of political campaigners are embracing the internet with the fervour their parents showed for sit-ins as they try to claw back its independence and make online actions a standard part of modern protests.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:27 PM Tue 2 Jan 2001 Categories: The Guardian
Omagh bombing cited by agencies demanding access to all phone calls - The Guardian

'The security and intelligence agencies are using difficulties in pursuing the perpetrators of the Omagh bombing in August 1998 in their demand for access to records of every phone call made in Britain.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:09 PM Tue 5 Dec 2000 Categories: Cybercrime , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Surveillance & Security News , The Guardian
Spies seek access to all phone, email and net links - The Guardian

'The security and intelligence agencies are demanding the right to access records of every phone call, email, and internet connection made in Britain, the Home Office confirmed yesterday.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:00 PM Mon 4 Dec 2000 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Surveillance & Security News , The Guardian
Why that joke email could get you the sack - The Guardian

'They were not even very good jokes. Certainly not the sort of thing you would send to your mother, but exactly the same as thousands of other smutty emails that whizz their way round the computers of Britain's offices every day.

But for Rupert Beverley and David Pennington, who worked for an engineering company in Huddersfield, forwarding the messages to colleagues was the worst mistake they ever made. Earlier this month an industrial tribunal unanimously rejected their claim for unfair dismissal. It found the company was perfectly within its rights to sack them not only for sending the emails - but more worryingly for the thousands of workers whose in-boxes are filled with personal mail - for the amount of time wasted in the process.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:53 PM Sat 2 Dec 2000 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Email? You've got the elbow - The Guardian

'All it takes to get the sack is a bit of malicious gossip, an email and a manager keen to use some of the latest software for snooping on staff. Any manager can do it. And if an employee finds out and complains, the employer can draw on a raft of government endorsed excuses to support their surreptitious activities.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:49 PM Sat 25 Nov 2000 Categories: The Guardian
Swamped with anomalies - The Guardian

'Everyone connected with employment issues agrees that employers should draft a policy governing how staff can use email systems, but there any consensus ends. What the policy should say and how it should be implemented are highly contentious issues.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:48 PM Sat 25 Nov 2000 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
The RIP Act - The Guardian

'The RIP Act, which comes into force today, allows the government to intercept online communications. Julian Glover and Patrick Barkham examine the controversy surrounding the new act and the implications for privacy and e-commerce' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:20 PM Tue 24 Oct 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , RIP Oversight (Part IV) , Reverse of burden of proof , The Guardian
Licensed to snoop - The Guardian

'Picture the scene: suddenly you get a boss who has got it in for you but can't fault you for any of your work. So he starts looking at all the back emails you have made, and all the websites you've visited, copies of which are on the back-up server even though you have deleted them.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:35 PM Wed 4 Oct 2000 Categories: Human Rights , The Guardian
New computer bill that probes too much - The Guardian

'Warning: There is a very real risk of the UK business environment turning into a state of information paranoia. The government may promise to deliver transparent and open management of the economy, but we in the internet sector are seeing a probing and increasingly secretive establishment.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:28 PM Tue 3 Oct 2000 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
New computer bill that probes too much - The Guardian

'Warning: There is a very real risk of the UK business environment turning into a state of information paranoia. The government may promise to deliver transparent and open management of the economy, but we in the internet sector are seeing a probing and increasingly secretive establishment.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:27 PM Tue 3 Oct 2000 Categories: The Guardian
The RIP Act - The Guardian

'The RIP Act, which comes into force today, allows the government to intercept online communications. Julian Glover and Patrick Barkham examine the controversy surrounding the new act and the implications for privacy and e-commerce' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:27 PM Sun 24 Sep 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , Privacy , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
Email spy law 'costly and undemocratic' - The Guardian

'Controversial new laws allowing the government to "spy" on emails were not only a severe threat to human rights and civil liberties but would undermine Britain's hopes of being a leading centre for e-commerce, the Liberal Democrats heard yesterday.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:18 PM Wed 20 Sep 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , Human Rights , The Guardian
All-seeing society - The Guardian

'With the nation fixated on television's parody of George Orwell's dystopic vision of the future, most of us have failed to notice the real Big Brother sneaking through the floorboards into the back of our screens. On July 28, while many of us were settling down with a bag of crisps to see whether Nasty Nick had been rumbled, the Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Act was passed.' link

Posted by SteveC at 01:33 PM Mon 11 Sep 2000 Categories: Cybercrime , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
The RIP Act and your rights - The Guardian

'The Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act is due to become law in October. A consultation period to fix regulations which outline the circumstances under which businesses can lawfully intercept employees' communications was to expire at the end of August, but has now been extended to September 15 at the insistence of industry, which wants more powers' link

Posted by SteveC at 01:27 PM Mon 4 Sep 2000 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Bosses beat email spying ban - The Guardian

'In a move described as 'alarming' by unions, the Government has bowed to pressure from big business to change parts of the controversial Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill, which is set to become law soon.' link

Posted by SteveC at 01:18 PM Sun 20 Aug 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , The Guardian
The spy in your server - The Guardian

'Governments all over the world have suddenly become embroiled in controversy about electronic surveillance of the internet. In the United States, a political storm has arisen over a new FBI internet tapping system codenamed Carnivore. In Britain, the Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Act has just extended telephone-tapping powers to cover internet service providers (ISPs), and allows the government to arrange indiscriminate tapping or email interception for foreign police forces and security agencies.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:41 PM Thu 10 Aug 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
E-envoy Alex Allan online chat - The Guardian

'Alex Allan, Tony Blair's digital envoy will be live online here on Friday 4 August at 3pm. Allan is charged with creating Britain's e-commerce strategy, putting government services online and working on using the net to improve the democratic process.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:37 PM Thu 3 Aug 2000 Categories: The Guardian
'I arrest you for emailing' - The Guardian

'On Friday the Queen graciously gave her assent to the Regulation of Investigatory Powers bill after it was fast-tracked through parliament with the agreement of the two main parties. So the RIP bill is now the RIP Act, yet another piece of legislation which will prevent journalists from operating freely in the public interest.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:29 PM Mon 31 Jul 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
May your privacy RIP - The Guardian

'The 'snoopers' charter' is now ready to become law, allowing the government unprecedented powers to pry into business and personal electronic communication. But, says Online editor Victor Keegan, it's the nature of the electronic beast to find ways of escape' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:18 PM Thu 27 Jul 2000 Categories: The Guardian
UN report scorns UK human rights record - The Guardian

'A devastating United Nations report has condemned the UK's human rights record and called for sweeping reforms to the security services, an end to gagging orders and protection for journalists who expose wrongdoing inside MI5 and MI6.' link

Posted by SteveC at 05:22 PM Thu 20 Jul 2000 Categories: Human Rights , Privacy , Reports/Equiries , The Guardian
That charter for snoopers - The Guardian

'Parliament today has its last opportunity to object to the government plan to give sweeping new powers for intelligence agencies - indeed, any public authority - to conduct covert surveillance, including intercepting emails and bugging property.' link

Posted by SteveC at 05:12 PM Wed 19 Jul 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Lords join the left to curb net snoopers - The Guardian

'It is probably the most complex and technically drafted bill to go through parliament in 40 years, and even now, with the honourable exception of six or so Labour backbenchers, no one in the parliamentary Labour party has bothered to understand it. There is enormous cynicsm among MPs. They don't think they are going to get brownie points with their constituencies if they rebel.' link

Posted by SteveC at 05:07 PM Wed 19 Jul 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
No 10's leaked memo reveals faults in RIP bill - The Guardian

'If hackers can access the government's site, it sends a highly pessimistic message to companies around the world planning to do electronic business with UK companies. And, of course, individuals as well.' link

Posted by SteveC at 05:02 PM Mon 17 Jul 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , The Guardian
Lament of the cheesed-off chiefs - The Guardian

'Bob Brace, vice-president of channel marketing for Nokia, said the RIP bill was a waste of time. "Most government officials are not IT literate and do not understand what the bill actually means," he said.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:47 PM Thu 13 Jul 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , The Guardian
Internet spy bill set at £20m - The Guardian

'The government is to hand business £20m to cover the cost of installing "black box recorders" from which the security services will be able to intercept internet traffic, including emails.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:17 PM Fri 7 Jul 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
RIP bill no match for technology - The Guardian

'The government's contentious internet surveillance bill, already under threat from the House of Lords, could be rendered unenforceable by simple security mechanisms that already exist.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:57 PM Tue 27 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
Ministers back down on email 'spy charter' - The Guardian

'The government is to back down following public uproar over a new security services legal framework, which critics claim will give British spies untrammelled access to email.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:56 PM Tue 27 Jun 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Straw braced for defeat over RIP bill - The Guardian

'The beleaguered Home Office, already facing criticism over its handling of asylum seekers and football hooligans, is also bracing itself for the prospect of a swath of defeats over the regulation of the internet.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:30 PM Mon 19 Jun 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
'Doing nothing is just not an option' - The Guardian

'Opponents of the new controls are elitist, Thatcherite and afraid of democracy' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:22 PM Sun 18 Jun 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
A devil at every door - The Guardian

'Where New Labour has most cruelly disappointed is the speed and completeness with which it became "executive-minded". That especially marks Jack Straw and his Home Office colleagues. They slip too easily into the world view of security service directors-general and senior police officers. The state is under siege. Crime, disorder and libertinism are rife. Unless "the authorities" (a satisfying Home Office term, that) are given vast new powers to eavesdrop, discipline and investigate, chaos will ensue.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:02 PM Sat 17 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Liberty RIP - The Guardian

'It is very disingenuous of John Abbott, head of the National Criminal Intelligence Service, and home office minister Charles Clarke (Letters, June 15) to argue that the regulation of investigatory powers bill simply aims to increase the accountability of the security services. This is not true.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:00 PM Sat 17 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
We won't read your emails - The Guardian

'The regulation of investigatory powers bill continues to be branded as a "massive extension of the state's power to spy on citizens" (Leader, June 12). This bill does not introduce new powers. It does, however, update the law enforcement agencies existing and highly regulated powers to fight organised criminals exploiting developing communications technology. A warrant, signed by the home secretary, will be needed to monitor emails in the same way one is needed now to monitor communications.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:37 PM Thu 15 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , RIP Oversight (Part IV) , The Guardian
Lords to fight email tap bill - The Guardian

'The government's bill to allow MI5 access to encoded email last night faced the start of what may be a fatal drubbing from a cross-party coalition of peers concerned about both civil liberties and the security of business transactions.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:24 PM Tue 13 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Offshore haven - The Guardian

'The government last night poured cold water on a plan by group of entrepreneurs to establish a "data haven" on a rusting iron fortress in the North Sea in an attempt to circumvent new anti-cryptography laws.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:00 PM Tue 6 Jun 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
BCC attacks Straw 'licence to snoop' - The Guardian

'Powers allowing Scotland Yard, MI5 and other state agencies to intercept all internet and email communications involve "a serious potential invasion of commercial privacy" and ought to be radically redrafted, the British Chambers of Commerce said yesterday' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:53 PM Tue 6 Jun 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , Privacy , The Guardian
Hooked on secrecy - The Guardian

'The Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill extends existing bugging and tapping powers to all forms of communication, including mobile phones, emails and pictures sent electronically. The police would find it much easier to acquire data, including addresses of emails sent and received as well as websites hit and browsed by journalists, who could then no longer guarantee the security and identity of their sources.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:43 PM Thu 1 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Government tapping of phone calls between UK and Ireland challenged - The Guardian

'The government is being taken to the European human rights court over allegations that the security and intelligence agencies have been engaged in the wholesale tapping of telephone conversations between Britain and Ireland.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:37 PM Wed 31 May 2000 Categories: Privacy , The Guardian
Private means - The Guardian

'Our rulers invite us to believe that our safety is their over-riding consideration and that they therefore fight a lonely fight, day in, day out, against crime, drugs and a host of other menaces, such as people from other countries wanting to live here. They tell us that they can and will beat these things but that it will need eternal vigilance on their part and complete subordination on ours. For these threats to be overcome, the state must know everything about us and we must know nothing about the state. And if we're not happy with the relationship, it can only be supposed either that we have no regard for the safety of our children, or that we are up to no good ourselves.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:31 PM Sat 27 May 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Newspapers challenge widening of police, security agency powers - The Guardian

'The Guardian and the Observer will tomorrow challenge in the high court an order made by an Old Bailey judge to hand over any emails or notes the newspapers may possess relating to the MI5 renegade David Shayler.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:10 PM Mon 22 May 2000 Categories: Freedom of Information , The Guardian
Four threats to the public's right to know - The Guardian

'The freedom of information bill, now going through parliament, gives fewer rights to official information than those enjoyed by citizens of the US, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the Irish Republic. In some respects, the rights are weaker than those under the last Tory government's open government code.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:05 PM Mon 22 May 2000 Categories: Freedom of Information , Privacy , The Guardian
Spider in the web - The Guardian

'As far as the internet goes, America is the land of the free. But Britain certainly isn't
Free speech on the net: special report' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:19 PM Wed 3 May 2000 Categories: Cybercrime , Privacy , The Guardian
MI5's email snoops - The Guardian

'Yes, MI5 is building a new surveillance centre that will enable it to monitor all British emails and internet transactions. But fear not: that prize ass Tom King MP, outgoing chairman of the parliamentary intelligence committee, reassures us that all warrants for email-tapping will be scrutinised by Lord Nolan, the commissioner for the interception of communications.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:16 PM Wed 3 May 2000 Categories: Cybercrime , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Spies Like Us - The Guardian

'The U.S. government says it doesn’t do it. Russia does it, which surprises no one. Now Great Britain wants to spy on its own citizens’ e-mails. A new British bill would enable law enforcement officials to watch every byte of e-mail as it passes through the country’s networks, in real time. The government’s Home Office says the new system is necessary to catch criminals who do their business online.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:13 PM Wed 3 May 2000 Categories: Cybercrime , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Protection or persecution? - The Guardian

'Feelings are running high in the e-world over the RIP - regulation of investigatory powers - bill. Here, Peter Sommer gives the background to a debate between two of the leading protagonists' link

Posted by SteveC at 01:49 PM Thu 30 Mar 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
MI5 bugging exempt from privacy act - The Guardian

'Covert surveillance by MI5, MI6 and the police, including tapping phones and bugging homes, will be exempt from challenge under a new right to privacy contained in the Human Rights Act, it has emerged.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:25 AM Mon 27 Mar 2000 Categories: Human Rights , Privacy , The Guardian
It's RIP basic human rights in 'worst UK legislation ever' looms - The Guardian

'To LSE for a conference on the Interior Ministry's Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Bill, currently in Committee in the Mother of Parliaments. Readers of this column will know that, among other things, this odious piece of legislation reverses the ancient principle of natural justice that says that a person should be pre sumed innocent until proven guilty.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:22 AM Sun 26 Mar 2000 Categories: Govt. Consultations , Human Rights , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
The key to security (Letter from Charles Clarke) - The Guardian

The regulation of investigatory powers RIP bill updates vital powers for a changing technological world in a way consistent with the requirements of the European convention on human rights (Leader, March 7). These powers will be subject to safeguards and external supervision more tightly drawn than ever before. link

Posted by SteveC at 03:20 PM Fri 10 Mar 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
Net sets a legal challenge - The Guardian

'Your leader (March 7) on some of the implications of the regulation of investigatory powers (RIP) bill was wrong on one important count: there is no presumption of guilt. Before a person might be convicted of failing to produce for the police the necessary key to decrypt an encrypted file, a jury has to be convinced that the person concerned was in possession of that key. A jury would therefore be invited to conclude that the person's failure now to produce the key was simply an attempt to avoid disclosing the content of their encrypted messages or files.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:17 PM Wed 8 Mar 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
RIP for basic liberties - The Guardian

'Michael Gapes, Labour MP for Ilford South, told the Commons yesterday how his father as a postman would have to deliver letters to a certain place where they were opened then resealed before continuing their journey to the recipient's house. He was speaking during the second reading of the controversial regulation of investigatory powers (RIP) bill. Everyone knows that interception takes place and that it is the duty of the authorities to hunt down drug-pushers, paedophiles and money-launderers by all legal means. The RIP bill still fails to strike the right balance between an individual's right to privacy and the state's duty to track down criminals. Even Jack Straw at his most avuncular could not explain why the right to authorise interception should rest with him (and his less avuncular successors) rather than with judges as in many other countries.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:06 PM Tue 7 Mar 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
Ministers seek wide bugging powers - The Guardian

'Sweeping powers allowing the intelligence services and other government agencies to conduct covert surveillance, including bugging phones and property, were proposed by the government yesterday. For the first time, they would have a statutory power to intercept pagers, mobile and satellite phones, and email, as well as private networks, including office switchboards.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:29 PM Fri 11 Feb 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian