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Archives for 'RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)' category.

Government outlines data retention plans - VNUNET

'Under the government proposals, mobile operators and internet service providers (ISPs) will be required to store information on users for up to 12 months. Details of who sent and received emails will need to be kept for six months.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:27 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
Data retention in the UK: It's a whole new ball game... - Silicon.com

'The UK government is scaling down its data retention plans in a renewed effort to quell public and industry disquiet, but even the new 'softer' policies have met with a mixed response, with one prominent think-tank labelling them a "sham".' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:13 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Silicon.com
Home Office in two minds on snooping - FIPR releases

'In June 2002 the Foundation for Information Policy Research (FIPR) was the first to draw attention to the Government's totally disproportionate proposals for access to communications data (records of email senders and receivers, phone numbers called or web pages visited). The Home Office apparently intended for every Whitehall or Town Hall bureaucrat to have access to this highly sensitive data. They now admit this was "not proportionate" and have set out schemes for limiting the type of data that might be accessed and the controls that might be applied.' Read the full FIPR release here

Posted by SteveC at 04:11 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: FIPR releases , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , RIP Oversight (Part IV) , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2)
MPs say snooping laws need ring fence - ZDNET

MPs say snooping laws need ring fence - New laws mean that ISPs face a mountain of requests for communications data - but government agencies can avoid paying costs by using old powers.

Posted by SteveC at 01:57 PM Mon 3 Feb 2003 Categories: RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , ZDNET
UK stands firm on snooping laws - Reports/Equiries

UK stands firm on snooping laws - The UK Government is determined to push ahead with its plans for internet snooping despite mounting opposition.

Posted by SteveC at 04:10 PM Thu 30 Jan 2003 Categories: BBC , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , RIP Oversight (Part IV) , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2) , Reports/Equiries
APIG report complete - Reports/Equiries

The All Party Internet Group (APIG) inquiry into Government access to communications data has been released here. See also the oral and written evidence. Also APIG press notices.

Posted by SteveC at 03:56 PM Tue 28 Jan 2003 Categories: Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , RIP Oversight (Part IV) , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2) , Reports/Equiries
Rethink urged over net snooping laws - Govt. Consultations

Rethink urged over net snooping laws - "Net snooping laws in the UK are a mess"

Posted by SteveC at 03:42 PM Thu 19 Dec 2002 Categories: BBC , Govt. Consultations , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2)
FPIR Consultation Response - Reports/Equiries

FIPR response to the All Party Internet Group public inquiry into all aspects of communications data retention and the subsequent access to that data.

Posted by SteveC at 03:25 PM Sun 15 Dec 2002 Categories: RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , RIP Oversight (Part IV) , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2) , Reports/Equiries
EU snooping plans dwarfed by UK laws - RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)

EU snooping plans dwarfed by UK laws - "...in Britain, we are well ahead of the rest of Europe in the data snooping race..."

Posted by SteveC at 03:44 PM Tue 20 Aug 2002 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Switch on for state snooping - RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)

Switch on for state snooping

Posted by SteveC at 03:46 PM Wed 17 Jul 2002 Categories: BBC , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
Government plans snooping expansion - VNUNET

'The government is planning a massive extension of the number of public bodies that can snoop on details of telephone calls, email and web traffic.' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:25 PM Wed 12 Jun 2002 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
CIVIL RIGHTS FURY OVER E-MAIL ACCESS - The Mirror

'CIVIL rights groups yesterday blasted moves to give dozens of Government bodies sweeping new powers to snoop on our email and telephone records.' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:23 PM Wed 12 Jun 2002 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Mirror
New powers put privacy laws to the test - ZDNET

'The government's move to give more agencies access to personal Internet and telecoms information will put a strain on the Data Protection Act and other institutions, say critics' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:21 PM Wed 12 Jun 2002 Categories: Human Rights , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , ZDNET
UK pushes boundaries of citizen surveillance - The Guardian

'The data retention powers to be handed to a wide range of UK government agencies will exceed those available anywhere else in the world, writes Neil McIntosh' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:02 PM Wed 12 Jun 2002 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Stop the snoopers - The Guardian

'The decision of the government to intrude upon our private communications (Government sweeps aside privacy rights, June 11) is reason enough for this Labour party member to review his membership.' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:00 PM Wed 12 Jun 2002 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Councils granted all-seeing powers - The Times

'SEVEN government departments and all local councils will be able to access details of everyone's telephone and internet records under a sweeping expansion of Big Brother powers planned by David Blunkett.' link

Posted by SteveC at 06:58 PM Wed 12 Jun 2002 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Times
Government sweeps aside privacy rights - The Guardian

'Ministers were last night accused of conducting a systematic campaign to undermine the right to privacy as it emerged that a host of government departments, local councils and quangos are to be given the power to demand the communications records of every British telephone and internet user.' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:45 PM Tue 11 Jun 2002 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
'Massive abuse' of privacy feared - BBC

'Plans to increase the number of organisations that can look at records of what you do online could lead to widespread abuse of personal information, warn experts.' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:39 PM Tue 11 Jun 2002 Categories: BBC , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
Snoops a go-go: UK gov goes mad on privacy invasion - The Register

'The UK government intends to implement sweeping extensions to the snooping powers of official bodies before its controversial Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act (RIPA) even comes into force. RIPA was bludgeoned through Parliament two years ago in the face of heavy opposition, and is to come into force later this year.' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:27 PM Tue 11 Jun 2002 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Register
UK plans to extend snooping powers - NewScientist

'The UK government has revealed plans to extend the range of officials allowed to snoop on people by accessing their email and phone records. Privacy campaigners say they are "appalled".' link

Posted by SteveC at 06:55 PM Tue 11 Jun 2002 Categories: NewScientist , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
Civil liberties groups attack 'snooper's charter' - ePolitix

'MPs will next week debate moves to allow government departments, agencies and local councils gain access to private emails and telephone records. The move, dubbed a "snooper's charter" by critics, will give new powers to departments including the department of the environment, the Home Office and the DTI.' link

Posted by SteveC at 06:52 PM Tue 11 Jun 2002 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , ePolitix
FIPR appalled by huge increase in Government snooping - FIPR releases

The Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Act is to be amended before it even comes into force to dramatically increase the number of official bodies that can access personal details of phone calls and emails. The Act was hugely controversial when it went through Parliament in 2000, with defeats for the Government in the Lords and significant changes being made to prevent its complete rejection.

Now the powers that were originally only given to the police, customs, secret services and the taxman are to be made available to a huge range of Government departments, local authorities, the NHS and even to Consignia (the Post Office).

Ian Brown, Director of FIPR commented, "I am appalled at this huge increase in the scope of Government snooping. Two years ago, we were deeply concerned that these powers were to be given to the police without any judicial oversight. Now they're handing them out to a practically endless queue of bureaucrats in Whitehall and Town Halls."

Read the full press release here

Posted by SteveC at 01:25 PM Mon 10 Jun 2002 Categories: FIPR releases , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
Police to spy on all emails - The Observer

'Millions of personal emails, other internet information and telephone records are to be made accessible to the police and intelligence services in a move that has been denounced by critics as one of the most wide-ranging extensions of state power over private information.' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:47 PM Sun 9 Jun 2002 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Observer
Email snooping bill enrages privacy groups - Silicon.com

'Privacy groups are up in arms over European laws concerning electronic data retention, spam and cookies which were passed today.' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:33 PM Thu 30 May 2002 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Silicon.com
Government unleashes hi-tech super sleuths - VNUNET

Government unleashes hi-tech super sleuths

Posted by SteveC at 12:45 PM Wed 18 Apr 2001 Categories: Cybercrime , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
New force to tackle cybercrime - BBC

NO MENTION OF RIP New force to tackle cybercrime

Posted by SteveC at 12:40 PM Wed 18 Apr 2001 Categories: BBC , Cybercrime , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
War On Cyber Crime - Sky News

NO MENTION OF RIP War On Cyber Crime - claimed to be a bigger threat to Britain than terrorism.

Posted by SteveC at 12:35 PM Wed 18 Apr 2001 Categories: Cybercrime , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Sky News
Tories pledge to boost broadband and e-commerce - ZDNET

Tories pledge to boost broadband and e-commerce

Posted by SteveC at 12:49 PM Tue 17 Apr 2001 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , ZDNET
US company defeats Brit RIP Act - The Register

'Anonymous Web-surfing outfit SafeWeb has just expanded its secure server facilities in New York so that Europeans can enjoy faster access to private, and virtually anonymous, Web browsing and e-mail.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:30 PM Fri 30 Mar 2001 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Surveillance & Security , Technical countermeasures , The Register
UUNet falls foul of RIP Act - VNUNET

'UUNet last week became the first internet service provider (ISP) to fall foul of tough new laws on intercepting emails.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:45 PM Wed 24 Jan 2001 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Surveillance & Security , VNUNET
The solution to RIP, email sackings and Big Brother - The Register

'The last six months have been a terrible time for Internet users in the UK. The RIP Act is obviously the worst of it - the government has given itself almost unbelievable powers of access to people's communication and then gone out of its way to make it as non-answerable to the public as possible.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:37 PM Fri 12 Jan 2001 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Surveillance & Security , The Register
'Lewd' e-mailers keep jobs - BBC

'Workers suspended by a leading insurance company over the distribution of 'lewd' e-mails have been told their jobs are safe.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:36 PM Thu 11 Jan 2001 Categories: BBC , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Surveillance & Security
Unions concerned about BBC email policy - The Guardian

'The BBC is the latest firm to come under union scrutiny over its powers to open staff emails.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:34 PM Tue 9 Jan 2001 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Beware - you've got mail - The Observer

'You are sitting at your desk. Your computer boings and the 'You have New Mail/Open Mail' icon appears. A friend who works downstairs in your office has sent an email with an attachment and copied it to everyone else who works in your team. Do you stop and think before you open it?' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:33 PM Sun 7 Jan 2001 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Surveillance & Security , The Observer
TUC claims firms overreact by sacking staff for lewd office emails - The Guardian

'Workers who send lewd emails around the office were being targeted unfairly by their employers, the Trades Union Congress yesterday claimed.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:31 PM Sat 6 Jan 2001 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Surveillance & Security , The Guardian
Big Brother warning after e-mail sackings - BBC

'Union leaders representing insurance workers sacked over 'lewd' e-mails fear the action could lead to a Big Brother office environment.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:30 PM Fri 5 Jan 2001 Categories: BBC , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Surveillance & Security
Firms 'should allow personal e-mails' - BBC

'TUC general secretary John Monks said recent regulations, giving employers sweeping powers to monitor their workers' e-mails and internet activity, had left many people worried that managers might be "snooping" on their personal e-mails.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:43 PM Sun 17 Dec 2000 Categories: BBC , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
Press send to censor - BBC

'A majority of companies will soon be monitoring employee e-mails in a bid to stop their reputation being damaged by inappropriate messages.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:18 PM Fri 15 Dec 2000 Categories: BBC , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Surveillance & Security
Govt ministers distance themselves from email spy plan - The Register

'Government ministers are distancing themselves from the Draconian surveillance measures proposed by NCIS deputy Roger Gaspar in a report to the Home Office.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:10 PM Tue 5 Dec 2000 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Surveillance & Security , The Register
Omagh bombing cited by agencies demanding access to all phone calls - The Guardian

'The security and intelligence agencies are using difficulties in pursuing the perpetrators of the Omagh bombing in August 1998 in their demand for access to records of every phone call made in Britain.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:09 PM Tue 5 Dec 2000 Categories: Cybercrime , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Surveillance & Security , The Guardian
E-mail spy powers 'necessary' - BBC

'Powers for the police and other law enforcement agencies to snoop on e-mails, telephone calls and internet traffic must be granted in order to combat modern crime, a senior intelligence officer has warned.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:05 PM Mon 4 Dec 2000 Categories: BBC , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Surveillance & Security
Police request right to spy on every UK phone call and email - The Register

'A report by the deputy director-general of the National Criminal Intelligence Service - sent to the Home Office and leaked to the Observer newspaper - has shocked many by asking for the legal right to access records of all phone calls, emails and Internet dial-ups made in the UK for a period of up to seven years.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:03 PM Mon 4 Dec 2000 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Surveillance & Security , The Register
Spies seek access to all phone, email and net links - The Guardian

'The security and intelligence agencies are demanding the right to access records of every phone call, email, and internet connection made in Britain, the Home Office confirmed yesterday.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:00 PM Mon 4 Dec 2000 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Surveillance & Security , The Guardian
Spy plans 'threat to human rights' - BBC

'Civil liberties campaigners have warned the government that granting police and secret services greater snooping powers would be a breach of human rights.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:59 PM Sun 3 Dec 2000 Categories: BBC , Human Rights , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Surveillance & Security
Spied on from cradle to grave - The Observer

'For a decade, the world has been dazzled by the possibilities of information technology, but beside the opportunities lie new dangers. IT opens up avenues of communication, but it also opens avenues of government control. The British, with a tradition of an unwritten constitution, executive power and few automatic rights, are the most exposed of all. Today, we disclose confidential advice offered by the National Criminal Intelligence Service to the Home Office. It argues that in order to fight contemporary crime, they must fight fire with fire. They want to store every telephone call (including mobile) and every email made in a huge government-run data warehouse for seven years to allow them to run electronic checks in support of any criminal investigation they might make. Although they recognise the civil liberties implications of what they demand, they claim that fighting crime is impossible without access to cyberspace in this way.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:57 PM Sun 3 Dec 2000 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Surveillance & Security , The Observer
Secret plan to spy on all British phone calls - The Observer

'Britain's intelligence services are seeking powers to seize all records of telephone calls, emails and internet connections made by every person living in this country.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:55 PM Sun 3 Dec 2000 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Surveillance & Security , The Observer
Why that joke email could get you the sack - The Guardian

'They were not even very good jokes. Certainly not the sort of thing you would send to your mother, but exactly the same as thousands of other smutty emails that whizz their way round the computers of Britain's offices every day.

But for Rupert Beverley and David Pennington, who worked for an engineering company in Huddersfield, forwarding the messages to colleagues was the worst mistake they ever made. Earlier this month an industrial tribunal unanimously rejected their claim for unfair dismissal. It found the company was perfectly within its rights to sack them not only for sending the emails - but more worryingly for the thousands of workers whose in-boxes are filled with personal mail - for the amount of time wasted in the process.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:53 PM Sat 2 Dec 2000 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Email snooping row kicks off again - The Register

'The code contradicts the government's official line on email monitoring, stating that emails marked personal or private should be off-bounds to employers. She also says staff should be made aware when they are being watched. Any monitoring outside these two conditions should be carried out only in order to detect or prevent a crime. In contrast, the government says employers should have "routine access" to staff emails and phone conversations.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:51 PM Tue 28 Nov 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Register
Swamped with anomalies - The Guardian

'Everyone connected with employment issues agrees that employers should draft a policy governing how staff can use email systems, but there any consensus ends. What the policy should say and how it should be implemented are highly contentious issues.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:48 PM Sat 25 Nov 2000 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
TUC gets arsey about RIP email laws - The Register

'The Trades Union Congress has embarked on a mini-crusade for a code of practice for employers when using the new email snooping laws allowed under the RIP Act.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:45 PM Fri 17 Nov 2000 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Register
The RIP Act - The Guardian

'The RIP Act, which comes into force today, allows the government to intercept online communications. Julian Glover and Patrick Barkham examine the controversy surrounding the new act and the implications for privacy and e-commerce' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:20 PM Tue 24 Oct 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , RIP Oversight (Part IV) , Reverse of burden of proof , The Guardian
Employers gain e-snoop powers - BBC

'New regulations giving employers sweeping powers to monitor their workers' e-mails and internet activity come into force in the UK on Tuesday.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:18 PM Tue 24 Oct 2000 Categories: BBC , Human Rights , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
Bosses join email snooping scrum - The Register

'The CBI has slammed the proposed Data Protection Commission's (DPC) draft code of practice on interception of emails and phone calls. The code is currently based on what were draft regulations and so is out of date, it says.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:15 PM Tue 17 Oct 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , Human Rights , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Register
U.K. snoop law may conflict with EU Human Rights Act - CNN

'(IDG) -- Trade unions are concerned that portions of the new surveillance bill granting the U.K. government sweeping powers to access e-mail and other encrypted Internet communications may be in conflict with the Human Rights Act, both of which became U.K. law on Monday, Oct. 2.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:11 PM Thu 5 Oct 2000 Categories: CNN , Human Rights , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
U.K. Bosses Get Access To Staff E-mail - TechWeb

'British privacy activists are challenging new rules that will let employers read their staff's e-mail without seeking permission first.' link

Posted by SteveC at 11:55 AM Wed 4 Oct 2000 Categories: Human Rights , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , TechWeb
New computer bill that probes too much - The Guardian

'Warning: There is a very real risk of the UK business environment turning into a state of information paranoia. The government may promise to deliver transparent and open management of the economy, but we in the internet sector are seeing a probing and increasingly secretive establishment.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:28 PM Tue 3 Oct 2000 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Watch how you go! - part two - VNUNET

'At the time of writing, the UK government's infamous Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill (the so-called Snooper's Charter or RIP, in common parlance) is still undergoing considerable changes.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:14 PM Wed 20 Sep 2000 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
Email snooping debate is over - VNUNET

'Email interception proposals will finally become law next month following the conclusion on Friday of an extended consultation period to clarify exactly who has the power to snoop on whom.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:10 PM Fri 15 Sep 2000 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
All-seeing society - The Guardian

'With the nation fixated on television's parody of George Orwell's dystopic vision of the future, most of us have failed to notice the real Big Brother sneaking through the floorboards into the back of our screens. On July 28, while many of us were settling down with a bag of crisps to see whether Nasty Nick had been rumbled, the Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Act was passed.' link

Posted by SteveC at 01:33 PM Mon 11 Sep 2000 Categories: Cybercrime , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
US users bite back at snooping law - VNUNET

'Against this background it's not too surprising what Americans think of their government's equivalent to the sealed boxes that UK security services can install at ISPs under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act. As in, not much.' link

Posted by SteveC at 01:30 PM Tue 5 Sep 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
The RIP Act and your rights - The Guardian

'The Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act is due to become law in October. A consultation period to fix regulations which outline the circumstances under which businesses can lawfully intercept employees' communications was to expire at the end of August, but has now been extended to September 15 at the insistence of industry, which wants more powers' link

Posted by SteveC at 01:27 PM Mon 4 Sep 2000 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
RIP Bill hit by delay over email rules - VNUNET

'The UK government has admitted it will have only a partial set of email interception rules in place by its 2 October deadline.' link

Posted by SteveC at 01:24 PM Fri 25 Aug 2000 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
Are British bobbies reading your e-mail? - Salon.com

'While Americans gnash their teeth about the FBI's Carnivore spying technology, U.K. legislators pass a law that could let cops read your messages.' link

Posted by SteveC at 01:21 PM Wed 23 Aug 2000 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Salon.com
The spy in your server - The Guardian

'Governments all over the world have suddenly become embroiled in controversy about electronic surveillance of the internet. In the United States, a political storm has arisen over a new FBI internet tapping system codenamed Carnivore. In Britain, the Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Act has just extended telephone-tapping powers to cover internet service providers (ISPs), and allows the government to arrange indiscriminate tapping or email interception for foreign police forces and security agencies.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:41 PM Thu 10 Aug 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
'I arrest you for emailing' - The Guardian

'On Friday the Queen graciously gave her assent to the Regulation of Investigatory Powers bill after it was fast-tracked through parliament with the agreement of the two main parties. So the RIP bill is now the RIP Act, yet another piece of legislation which will prevent journalists from operating freely in the public interest.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:29 PM Mon 31 Jul 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
'Snooping Bill technically inept' - BBC

'The UK Government's plans to eavesdrop on criminals that use the internet are "technically inept", say security experts.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:09 PM Wed 26 Jul 2000 Categories: BBC , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Reports/Equiries
How to dodge RIP - The Register

'A report due to be published tonight will explain how to dodge the government's email snooping bill via a few simple steps' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:07 PM Wed 26 Jul 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Register
That charter for snoopers - The Guardian

'Parliament today has its last opportunity to object to the government plan to give sweeping new powers for intelligence agencies - indeed, any public authority - to conduct covert surveillance, including intercepting emails and bugging property.' link

Posted by SteveC at 05:12 PM Wed 19 Jul 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Safeguard over e-mail 'snooping' Bill - BBC

'The government has agreed a new safeguard on its 'snooping Bill' aimed at tackling cyber crime, to try to ease opponents' fears over potential abuse by security forces.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:41 PM Thu 13 Jul 2000 Categories: BBC , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
'Snooping' bill protests stepped up - BBC

'Opponents of the government's "snooping" bill are keeping up the pressure to amend or scrap the controversial legislation.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:37 PM Wed 12 Jul 2000 Categories: BBC , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
UK groups urge Lords to scrap RIP Bill - VNUNET

'An alliance of more than 50 UK organisations has called on the House of Lords to scrap the controversial Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:35 PM Wed 12 Jul 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
ISPs RIP warning - BBC

'The UK Government's "snooping bill" is making internet companies consider moving their businesses overseas.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:33 PM Tue 11 Jul 2000 Categories: BBC , Cost to industry , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
ISPs fly to continent to escape RIP - The Register

'Two more ISPs have threatened to up sticks and move their email systems overseas if the government goes ahead with its planned Web snooping plans.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:31 PM Tue 11 Jul 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Register
ISP considers quitting UK over RIP bill - VNUNET

'A Manchester-based ISP is threatening to move some of its services abroad to protect client confidentiality if the UK government does not make significant changes to the so-called internet snooping bill.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:28 PM Mon 10 Jul 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , Human Rights , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
Firm's threat over 'net-spying' Bill - thisismoney

'A major internet service provider is threatening to quit Britain if the Government pushes ahead with a controversial bill to snoop on e-mails. Poptel, which provides net services to the TUC as well as various unions and voluntary groups, said that the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill should be rethought.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:26 PM Sun 9 Jul 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , Human Rights , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , thisismoney
ISP RIPs up UK domicile - The Register

'Poptel, a British ISP which counts the Trades Union Congress TUC) among its customers, is threatening to move abroad, unless the Government ditches email snooping rights introduced through the Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Bill.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:24 PM Sun 9 Jul 2000 Categories: Human Rights , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Register
Crackdown on computer criminals - BBC

'The UK Government is setting up an agency dedicated to fighting cyber-crime. The high-tech crime unit will help police forces cope with the growing numbers of criminals who use computers and tackle the new crimes that computers make possible.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:21 PM Fri 7 Jul 2000 Categories: BBC , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
Police email snooping powers tamed - VNUNET

'Home Office ministers have moved to restrict the police's power to snoop on internet surfing and email, to ease the public's fears of 'Big Brother' law enforcement.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:19 PM Fri 7 Jul 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
Internet spy bill set at £20m - The Guardian

'The government is to hand business £20m to cover the cost of installing "black box recorders" from which the security services will be able to intercept internet traffic, including emails.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:17 PM Fri 7 Jul 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Net laws 'still allow snooping' - BBC

'Changes to the UK Government's "snooping" Bill have done little to limit the power it gives police to spy on citizens, say civil liberty campaigners.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:09 PM Thu 6 Jul 2000 Categories: BBC , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
Climbdown on e-snooping Bill - The Observer

'A raft of amendments is expected to the highly controversial Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill which is currently passing through Parliament. Legal experts predict there will be more embarrassing climbdowns for the Government in the next few weeks.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:00 PM Sun 2 Jul 2000 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Observer
Locked in the crypt - Internet Magazine

'When the Government published the Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Bill in February, it looked like Home Secretary Jack Straw and his ministerial poodle Charles Clarke were just demonstrating how little they understood the Net. The idea was to bring police phone-tapping powers up to date so they applied to online communications. But the Home Office slipped in two rather nasty proposals.' link

Posted by SteveC at 01:22 PM Sat 1 Jul 2000 Categories: Internet Magazine , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
Ministers back down on email 'spy charter' - The Guardian

'The government is to back down following public uproar over a new security services legal framework, which critics claim will give British spies untrammelled access to email.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:56 PM Tue 27 Jun 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
U.K. pulls back on cybersnoop bill - CNN

'(IDG) -- In the face of increasing pressure from privacy groups, business groups and Internet service providers (ISPs), the U.K. government is backing away from some of the more controversial aspects of its e-mail surveillance bill currently under consideration in the House of Lords.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:53 PM Mon 26 Jun 2000 Categories: CNN , Cost to industry , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
RIP could scupper our e-revolution - The Observer

'[...]But in any case the Bill will have minimal effect on crime because all but the most stupid criminals will simply switch to a foreign internet service provider for their emails, if necessary via a mobile phone. It already makes sense to host your website in the United States, not only because it's usually cheaper but also because the US constitution provides far greater legal protection than in the UK.[...]' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:25 PM Sun 25 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Surveillance & Security , The Observer
RIP could scupper our e-revolution - The Observer

'If John Carr really believes the opposition to the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill is Thatcherite, élitist and anti-democratic, perhaps he should get out more. But in any case the Bill will have minimal effect on crime because all but the most stupid criminals will simply switch to a foreign internet service provider for their emails, if necessary via a mobile phone.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:51 PM Sun 25 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Observer
Big browser is watching the web - The Observer

'Type a few words into a web search-engine and you can find information on any subject in seconds. What happens next depends what one is thinking about and one's reaction to that information. RIP's proponents say the internet is like a public space, and just as the police don't need a judge's warrant merely to keep any eye on someone in the street, they must be allowed to track any person's movements as they click from website to website.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:49 PM Sun 25 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Observer
NTK 2000-06-23 - NTK

A defender for RIP! John Carr has been quick to come to the defence of the new bill, telling the OBSERVER newspaper that "Children, consumers, trading companies and financial institutions have all been targeted and harmed, some very seriously" by the evil cyberterrorists that the bill will thwart. He does this, of course, in his role as outspokensman for NCH Action for Children - and certainly not as the husband of Baroness Thornton, the peer most keen in the house get the industry to pay for RIP.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:45 PM Fri 23 Jun 2000 Categories: NTK , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
Waugh hits out at RIP - The Register

'Yesterday, Auberon Waugh - one of the Telegraph's finest curmudgeons - took his pen to Home Secretary Jack Straw over the Government's handling of Net issues in his column Way of the World.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:30 PM Thu 22 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Register
Net surveillance: Your questions answered - BBC

'Government minister Charles Clarke answers your questions on net surveillance.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:23 PM Tue 20 Jun 2000 Categories: BBC , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , RIP Oversight (Part IV)
New web spy system is not up to the job, say the experts - The Observer

'MI5 and the police faced embarrassment last night when electronics experts revealed that the new 'Big Brother' internet surveillance system - designed to enable them to monitor every internet user in the country - will not function properly.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:05 PM Sun 18 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Observer
A devil at every door - The Guardian

'Where New Labour has most cruelly disappointed is the speed and completeness with which it became "executive-minded". That especially marks Jack Straw and his Home Office colleagues. They slip too easily into the world view of security service directors-general and senior police officers. The state is under siege. Crime, disorder and libertinism are rife. Unless "the authorities" (a satisfying Home Office term, that) are given vast new powers to eavesdrop, discipline and investigate, chaos will ensue.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:02 PM Sat 17 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Net tapping Bill fatally flawed - VNUNET

'A technical loophole that could render the Government's Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill (RIP) useless has been exposed' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:36 PM Fri 16 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
We won't read your emails - The Guardian

'The regulation of investigatory powers bill continues to be branded as a "massive extension of the state's power to spy on citizens" (Leader, June 12). This bill does not introduce new powers. It does, however, update the law enforcement agencies existing and highly regulated powers to fight organised criminals exploiting developing communications technology. A warrant, signed by the home secretary, will be needed to monitor emails in the same way one is needed now to monitor communications.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:37 PM Thu 15 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , RIP Oversight (Part IV) , The Guardian
Straw enters bitter row over RIP Bill - ZDNET

'In a week when the RIP Bill has been hit by increased and often bitter criticism, enter the Home Secretary to defend the government's plans, and criticise the British Chambers of Commerce's report' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:33 PM Thu 15 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , ZDNET
Data protection chief swipes out at spying Bill - ZDNET

'Britain's data protection commissioner Elizabeth France hit out at the government's controversial cyber-surveillance bill Wednesday.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:31 PM Wed 14 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , ZDNET
Lords to fight email tap bill - The Guardian

'The government's bill to allow MI5 access to encoded email last night faced the start of what may be a fatal drubbing from a cross-party coalition of peers concerned about both civil liberties and the security of business transactions.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:24 PM Tue 13 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Concern over U.K. e-mail surveillance bill grows - CNN

'A surveillance bill that would give the U.K. government sweeping powers to access e-mail and other encrypted Internet communications is coming under increasing criticism from companies and organizations as the bill heads for a vote in the House of Lords this week' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:22 PM Tue 13 Jun 2000 Categories: CNN , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
Why papers won't say our freedom is in peril - The Observer

'Did you know that the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill, in similar transition, hands MI5 the right to intercept any private email it chooses, without even prior clearance from a judge? Have you thought what that will mean for journalists' sources or for your own privacy?' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:10 PM Sun 11 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Observer
Your privacy ends here - The Observer

'When you wake on Thursday 5 October next, you will find yourself living in a different country. An ancient bulwark of English law - the principle that someone is presumed innocent until proven guilty - will have been overturned. And that is just for starters. From that date also the police and security services will enjoy sweeping powers to snoop on your email traffic and web use without let or hindrance from the Commissioner for Data Protection.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:45 PM Sun 4 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Observer
Hooked on secrecy - The Guardian

'The Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill extends existing bugging and tapping powers to all forms of communication, including mobile phones, emails and pictures sent electronically. The police would find it much easier to acquire data, including addresses of emails sent and received as well as websites hit and browsed by journalists, who could then no longer guarantee the security and identity of their sources.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:43 PM Thu 1 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Private means - The Guardian

'Our rulers invite us to believe that our safety is their over-riding consideration and that they therefore fight a lonely fight, day in, day out, against crime, drugs and a host of other menaces, such as people from other countries wanting to live here. They tell us that they can and will beat these things but that it will need eternal vigilance on their part and complete subordination on ours. For these threats to be overcome, the state must know everything about us and we must know nothing about the state. And if we're not happy with the relationship, it can only be supposed either that we have no regard for the safety of our children, or that we are up to no good ourselves.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:31 PM Sat 27 May 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Watching while you surf - BBC

'The UK is leading the world when it comes to high-tech spying on its citizens, say civil liberty and privacy groups.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:24 PM Thu 25 May 2000 Categories: BBC , Privacy , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
All Kafka'd up - NUJ

'Let's get straight to a fable showing how the Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Bill 2000 could affect you. It's conveniently difficult to write a who-what-when intro about one of the most heavily obfuscated pieces of legislation the Journalist has had the misfortune to encounter. The Home Office says its purpose is to regulate email interception, human surveillance of suspects, and the like. But do read on...' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:20 PM Wed 24 May 2000 Categories: NUJ , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
UK government forces through net spy bill - VNUNET

'The UK government is bracing itself for a major fight in the Lords over the cost and scope of legislation forcing ISPs to give police access to customers' internet traffic.'

Posted by SteveC at 03:53 PM Wed 10 May 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
Cyber-snooping Bill through House of Commons - ZDNET

'Sadly inadequate' RIP bill is branded by some MPs 'a ridiculous effort and a shame on Britain's long standing human rights record' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:47 PM Tue 9 May 2000 Categories: Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , ZDNET
UK moving to open all (e-)mail - Christian Science Monitor

'By the end of this year, any e-mail to or from a friend or business in England can be read by a British intelligence agent at MI5 headquarters in London.'

Posted by SteveC at 03:38 PM Fri 5 May 2000 Categories: Christian Science Monitor , Cybercrime , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
MI5's email snoops - The Guardian

'Yes, MI5 is building a new surveillance centre that will enable it to monitor all British emails and internet transactions. But fear not: that prize ass Tom King MP, outgoing chairman of the parliamentary intelligence committee, reassures us that all warrants for email-tapping will be scrutinised by Lord Nolan, the commissioner for the interception of communications.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:16 PM Wed 3 May 2000 Categories: Cybercrime , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Spies Like Us - The Guardian

'The U.S. government says it doesn’t do it. Russia does it, which surprises no one. Now Great Britain wants to spy on its own citizens’ e-mails. A new British bill would enable law enforcement officials to watch every byte of e-mail as it passes through the country’s networks, in real time. The government’s Home Office says the new system is necessary to catch criminals who do their business online.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:13 PM Wed 3 May 2000 Categories: Cybercrime , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Government to build new email and surfing surveillance centre - ZDNET

'A new centre for monitoring email and Internet communications is to be built by NCIS (National Criminal Intelligence Service) at the cost of £25m, the government said Tuesday.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:09 PM Tue 2 May 2000 Categories: Cybercrime , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , ZDNET
U.K. plan to open Internet spy center draws criticism - CNN

'(CNN) -- The United Kingdom Home Office is responding to the concerns of civil liberties groups over a government plan to open a facility designed to intercept and monitor Internet traffic, including e-mail and encrypted messages.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:06 PM Mon 1 May 2000 Categories: CNN , Cybercrime , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
Spy centre to spread its web - BBC

'The government is to build a £25m spy centre to monitor criminal gangs through their use of the internet. The Government Technical Assistance Centre (GTAC) is likely to be used to unscramble coded internet messages, tap phones and intercept e-mails.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:03 PM Mon 1 May 2000 Categories: BBC , Cybercrime , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
Computer cloaks and digital daggers - BBC

'The announcement that the government is to spend £25m on a new internet surveillance centre capable of tracking and intercepting electronic communications is clear evidence that a new era of digital spying has been ushered in.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:55 PM Sun 30 Apr 2000 Categories: BBC , Cybercrime , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
UK Building Eavesdropping Infrastructure - Slashdot

'This Sunday Times story about a new office under MI5 scheduled to open later this year with the innocuous name of "Government Technical Assistance Centre" to oversee the content of e-mail sent by and to Britons ought to give pause to anyone interested in online privacy. Though governments will always be several steps behind determined privacy seekers, this bodes ill for anyone who'd prefer to keep the contents of their e-mail even nominally secret. "The security service and the police will still need Home Office permission to search for e-mails and internet traffic, but they can apply for general warrants that would enable them to intercept communications for a company or an organisation," says the article. How comforting.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:59 PM Sat 29 Apr 2000 Categories: Cybercrime , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Slashdot
Delays hit email privacy law - VNUNET

'A new law that gives police the power to intercept emails could be delayed, due to disputes in Parliament about whether or not net users should have to prove their innocence.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:15 PM Wed 26 Apr 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
New law opens up private data to MI5 - VNUNET

'Users attending the fifth Scrambling for Safety conference last week were in for a shock when they gathered in London to debate the UK government's draft legislation on bugging communications.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:29 AM Fri 31 Mar 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
Snooping powers could harm cheap net access - VNUNET

'Tumbling internet access charges in the UK could be abruptly halted if the government forces ISPs to maintain expensive email interception facilities. Under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Bill, the government wants police agencies to have more control over electronic communications, including the power to intercept email.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:14 AM Fri 24 Mar 2000 Categories: RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
NTK lead - NTK

'On Monday, the REGULATION OF INVESTIGATORY POWERS BILL will get its second reading in the Commons. Then it goes to committee, then it becomes law, and then you'll never hear from it again, because talking about most of its powers will get you five years in prison. So, when the police ask your ISP to put a tap on your mail, you won't hear about it. When your local trades and standards officer decides to take a look at your browser log for the last month, you won't hear about it. And when they come and get your private encryption key so that can read your friend's mails, you won't be able to tell your friend - or us - that it happened. Hell, you won't even be able to change your key if that might give us a clue.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:56 PM Fri 3 Mar 2000 Categories: NTK , Privacy , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
Encryption at the mercy of the law - VNUNET

'The Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Bill, which allows police to intercept network data, sparked a storm of controversy when it was published by the UK government. The Bill, published on 10 February, updates legislation on the monitoring and interception of public and private communications and data by law enforcement agencies. It sets out rules and regulations for wire-tapping phones and data lines within ISP infrastructure, and the decoding of privately encrypted data.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:47 PM Mon 28 Feb 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
Irish, UK Crypto Regs Far Apart - Wired News

'DUBLIN, Ireland -- Britain is likely to become the first country in the world to make imprisonment a possible consequence of refusing to surrender, or even losing, one's private encryption keys. At the same time, neighboring Ireland is preparing legislation that would make it the first country to prohibit law enforcement from forcing encryption users to hand over their private keys.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:42 PM Wed 16 Feb 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Wired News