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September 2000 Archives

US spy software could devour RIP - VNUNET

'Developers in the US have uncovered a way of snubbing the American equivalent of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill, prompting speculation that a similar system could be introduced into the UK.'

Posted by SteveC at 04:22 PM Wed 27 Sep 2000 Categories: Technical countermeasures , VNUNET
E-minister defends snooping law - VNUNET

'Ecommerce minister Patricia Hewitt has defended the UK government's unpopular Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Act as a price worth paying to fight child pornography.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:24 PM Tue 26 Sep 2000 Categories: VNUNET
The RIP Act - The Guardian

'The RIP Act, which comes into force today, allows the government to intercept online communications. Julian Glover and Patrick Barkham examine the controversy surrounding the new act and the implications for privacy and e-commerce' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:27 PM Sun 24 Sep 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , Privacy , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
Email spy law 'costly and undemocratic' - The Guardian

'Controversial new laws allowing the government to "spy" on emails were not only a severe threat to human rights and civil liberties but would undermine Britain's hopes of being a leading centre for e-commerce, the Liberal Democrats heard yesterday.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:18 PM Wed 20 Sep 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , Human Rights , The Guardian
Lib Dems go against RIP bill - The Register

'The Liberal Democrat's Party convention has brought a few more people out of the shadows and into the fight against aspects of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) bill.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:16 PM Wed 20 Sep 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , The Register
Watch how you go! - part two - VNUNET

'At the time of writing, the UK government's infamous Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill (the so-called Snooper's Charter or RIP, in common parlance) is still undergoing considerable changes.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:14 PM Wed 20 Sep 2000 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
Email snooping debate is over - VNUNET

'Email interception proposals will finally become law next month following the conclusion on Friday of an extended consultation period to clarify exactly who has the power to snoop on whom.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:10 PM Fri 15 Sep 2000 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
All-seeing society - The Guardian

'With the nation fixated on television's parody of George Orwell's dystopic vision of the future, most of us have failed to notice the real Big Brother sneaking through the floorboards into the back of our screens. On July 28, while many of us were settling down with a bag of crisps to see whether Nasty Nick had been rumbled, the Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Act was passed.' link

Posted by SteveC at 01:33 PM Mon 11 Sep 2000 Categories: Cybercrime , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
US users bite back at snooping law - VNUNET

'Against this background it's not too surprising what Americans think of their government's equivalent to the sealed boxes that UK security services can install at ISPs under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act. As in, not much.' link

Posted by SteveC at 01:30 PM Tue 5 Sep 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
Hague's 17 new policies - BBC

"On taking office, reviewing the operation of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers legislation." link

Posted by SteveC at 01:29 PM Tue 5 Sep 2000 Categories: BBC
The RIP Act and your rights - The Guardian

'The Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act is due to become law in October. A consultation period to fix regulations which outline the circumstances under which businesses can lawfully intercept employees' communications was to expire at the end of August, but has now been extended to September 15 at the insistence of industry, which wants more powers' link

Posted by SteveC at 01:27 PM Mon 4 Sep 2000 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian