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Archives for 'RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2)' category.

'Snoopers' charter' unveiled - BBC

'Government agencies will be able to access e-mail and phone data, under measures unveiled by ministers.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:23 PM Mon 15 Sep 2003 Categories: BBC , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2)
Home Office snooping plans are almost unchanged - FIPR releases

'In June 2002 the Home Office backed down in the face of the outrage that greeted their totally disproportionate proposals for access to communications data (records of email senders and receivers, phone numbers called or web pages visited). Last week they gave the impression of a change of heart, yet closer examination of the detail of their proposals shows that their plans are almost entirely unchanged.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:20 PM Mon 15 Sep 2003 Categories: FIPR releases , Govt. Consultations , Privacy , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2)
Blunkett revives plan to let agencies trawl phone and net users' records - The Guardian

'Ministers are to press ahead with plans to ensure that communications companies retain the records of every telephone, internet and email user, in the face of determined opposition from industry and civil liberties groups.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:16 PM Mon 15 Sep 2003 Categories: RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2) , The Guardian
Regulation of Investigatory Powers (Communications Data) Order 2003 - Govt. Consultations

Consultation Paper on a Code of Practice for Voluntary Retention of Communications Data (under the Anti-Terrorism Crime and Security Act 2001) Response to the Consultation Paper. Access to Communications Data ? respecting privacy and protecting the public from crime Response to the Consultation Paper

Posted by SteveC at 11:46 AM Fri 12 Sep 2003 Categories: Data retention , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2)
Government snoop dogs get dogged - VNUNET

Privacy International is calling for UK consumers to take part in a 'Know your Data' campaign after warning that police and other agencies made hundreds of thousands of requests for data about individuals this year. link

Posted by SteveC at 12:57 PM Wed 21 May 2003 Categories: Privacy , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , VNUNET
Big Brother 'watches more of us every year' - The Telegraph

Police and government officials are demanding access to personal data on telephone calls and internet use of more than one million people every year, according to figures released yesterday. link

Posted by SteveC at 12:54 PM Wed 21 May 2003 Categories: Privacy , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , The Telegraph
Data retainers unite! You have nothing to lose but your freedoms - The Inquirer

'THE WEARINESS with which I approach yet again the subject of data retention tells me something about how bad policies get passed. The people who want them just keep plugging away until everyone's too exhausted to fight any more.' - link

Posted by SteveC at 11:42 PM Mon 12 May 2003 Categories: RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , The Inquirer
What David did next - The Guardian

After the furore over data protection last year, SA Mathieson explores the government's designs on our movements in the digital world link

Posted by SteveC at 12:46 PM Fri 25 Apr 2003 Categories: Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2) , The Guardian
Tory peers move to block snoopers' bill - The Guardian

'Lord Strathcylde, the Tory leader in the Lords, is prepared to obstruct government secondary legislation to stop what is seen as an infringe ment of civil liberties. The government plans that every local authority and a number of other public bodies and quangos will have access to phone, email and internet data, though not the content of these communications.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:19 AM Thu 20 Mar 2003 Categories: Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , The Guardian
How to avoid the online snoopers - BBC

'Where is the line to be drawn when it comes to protecting privacy and respected the law in the digital world, asks technology consultant Bill Thompson.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:02 AM Sun 16 Mar 2003 Categories: BBC , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2)
Disproportionate costs - The Inquirer

'This week saw the Home Office launch two consultations on communications data. The first covers access to communications data under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act (RIPA) - this is the revision to the set of proposals to allow everyone from the food safety people to the local parish council to see your data if they wanted to. The second is the voluntary code of practice for data retention under the Anti-Terrorism, Crime and Security Act (ATCS) - this is the bit about what data must be kept.' link

Posted by SteveC at 01:57 AM Sun 16 Mar 2003 Categories: Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2) , The Inquirer
Phone and e-mail 'snoopers' charter' is watered down - The Independent

'The Home Secretary admitted that he had blundered by drawing up plans last summer for what soon became known as a "snoopers' charter". The proposals, authorising Whitehall departments and local councils to access private information, have been watered down after opposition from civil liberties groups and computer professionals.' link

Posted by SteveC at 08:13 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , The Independent
Wide powers for state bodies in new 'snoopers' charter' - The Telegraph

'More than 24 state agencies and hundreds of local government officials will be given powers to demand the personal details of citizens under a revamped "snooper's charter" published yesterday.'link

Posted by SteveC at 08:11 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , The Telegraph
The 'snoopers' charter' explained - The Guardian

'What is the snoopers' charter? It's a plan to give state agencies access to your telephone, internet and email records. Data would include information including who you call on your mobile phone, and where you are calling from, and to whom and when you sent emails.' link

Posted by SteveC at 08:04 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , The Guardian
New limits may allay fears on snooping - The Guardian

'The proposals won a mixed response from civil liberties groups. John Wadham, the director of Liberty, said: "The original snooper's charter proposals were appallingly excessive. We welcome much of the government plan to step back from them. But authorities accessing this data should need a warrant from a judge - that's the only truly independent safeguard that can produce public confidence."' link

Posted by SteveC at 08:01 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , The Guardian
Fears persist as agencies get access to data - Financial Times

'The City regulator, the Office of Fair Trading and a host of other investigative bodies are set to have the power to access telephone and internet data following a review of the government's so-called "snoopers charter".' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:58 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Financial Times , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2)
Retention of communications data: Home Office consults - out-law.com

'The legislation does not oblige telcos and ISPs to retain data. However, it is worded such that if the industry doesn't accept a voluntary code of practice, the Government can make the retention requirement mandatory. And the views expressed within the industry have suggested that a voluntary Code will be rejected.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:50 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , out-law.com
RIP rethink doesn't go far - PC Plus

'Number of 'snoopers' reduced but no change to the six year logs' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:47 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , PC Plus , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2)
Ministers scale down 'snooper 's charter' - The Guardian

Officials had planned to allow a vast range of public bodies - including seven Whitehall departments, local councils and 11 quangos - the right to demand access to private communications records. link

Posted by SteveC at 04:42 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , The Guardian
British govt wants more snooping powers - TheStar

'Civil liberties groups have criticised the much publicised proposals, branding them a "snoopers' charter'' and the harbinger of an Orwellian state.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:37 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , TheStar
Licence to snoop - The Telegraph

'The Act has always been controversial. When the Home Office proposed extending it so that a huge range of government agencies and other public bodies, including local authorities, would be able to monitor our internet, email and telephone records with virtually no judicial control, all hell broke loose.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:34 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , The Telegraph
Government outlines data retention plans - VNUNET

'Under the government proposals, mobile operators and internet service providers (ISPs) will be required to store information on users for up to 12 months. Details of who sent and received emails will need to be kept for six months.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:27 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
Data retention in the UK: It's a whole new ball game... - Silicon.com

'The UK government is scaling down its data retention plans in a renewed effort to quell public and industry disquiet, but even the new 'softer' policies have met with a mixed response, with one prominent think-tank labelling them a "sham".' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:13 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Silicon.com
Home Office in two minds on snooping - FIPR releases

'In June 2002 the Foundation for Information Policy Research (FIPR) was the first to draw attention to the Government's totally disproportionate proposals for access to communications data (records of email senders and receivers, phone numbers called or web pages visited). The Home Office apparently intended for every Whitehall or Town Hall bureaucrat to have access to this highly sensitive data. They now admit this was "not proportionate" and have set out schemes for limiting the type of data that might be accessed and the controls that might be applied.' Read the full FIPR release here

Posted by SteveC at 04:11 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: FIPR releases , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , RIP Oversight (Part IV) , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2)
Cautious response to 'snoop' plans - BBC

"I would have expected rock sold commitments but instead the government is saying 'let's have another debate'. I'd have thought we were beyond that and now we seem to be back to square one," - Simon Davies, Head of Privacy International link

Posted by SteveC at 04:54 PM Tue 11 Mar 2003 Categories: BBC , Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2)
MPs say snooping laws need ring fence - ZDNET

MPs say snooping laws need ring fence - New laws mean that ISPs face a mountain of requests for communications data - but government agencies can avoid paying costs by using old powers.

Posted by SteveC at 01:57 PM Mon 3 Feb 2003 Categories: RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , ZDNET
UK stands firm on snooping laws - Reports/Equiries

UK stands firm on snooping laws - The UK Government is determined to push ahead with its plans for internet snooping despite mounting opposition.

Posted by SteveC at 04:10 PM Thu 30 Jan 2003 Categories: BBC , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , RIP Oversight (Part IV) , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2) , Reports/Equiries
Scrap data retention plans, say MPs - RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2)

An inquiry by a cross-party group of MPs says that not only should the government drop its data retention plans, but they should be scrapped across Europe

Posted by SteveC at 04:05 PM Wed 29 Jan 2003 Categories: RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , Reports/Equiries , ZDNET
APIG report complete - Reports/Equiries

The All Party Internet Group (APIG) inquiry into Government access to communications data has been released here. See also the oral and written evidence. Also APIG press notices.

Posted by SteveC at 03:56 PM Tue 28 Jan 2003 Categories: Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , RIP Oversight (Part IV) , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2) , Reports/Equiries
MPs say snooping laws need ring fence - RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2)

New laws mean that ISPs face a mountain of requests for communications data - but government agencies can avoid paying costs by using old powers

Posted by SteveC at 04:01 PM Fri 3 Jan 2003 Categories: RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , ZDNET
FPIR Consultation Response - Reports/Equiries

FIPR response to the All Party Internet Group public inquiry into all aspects of communications data retention and the subsequent access to that data.

Posted by SteveC at 03:25 PM Sun 15 Dec 2002 Categories: RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , RIP Oversight (Part IV) , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2) , Reports/Equiries
FIPR welcomes Government rethink on snooping powers - FIPR releases

The Home Office is reported to have postponed its proposals to amend the Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Act to allow a huge increase in the official that can access personal details of phone calls and emails.

Attention was first drawn to the highly technical Regulations encapsulating this change by an FIPR Press Release on 10th June. The story has since become headline news and the Government has now decided not to proceed with these changes.

Ian Brown, Director of FIPR welcomed this news, "these proposals were poorly considered, poorly justified and over the past week have been condemned by almost everyone outside of Whitehall. The Home Office must now tear them up and start again from first principles."

He continued, "we are as keen as anyone else in seeing wrongdoing investigated, but we don't think that handing out such wide-reaching powers to every bureaucrat in the land is compatible with living in a free society. The Government needs to carefully consider whether self-authorisation can ever be appropriate for this type of invasion of privacy and they need to pay a lot more attention to the oversight regime. An Interception Commissioner who doesn't have the resources to open all his mail is no credible way to ensure that abuse is detected."

Read the full press release here

Posted by SteveC at 01:24 PM Tue 18 Jun 2002 Categories: Data retention , FIPR releases , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2)
FIPR appalled by huge increase in Government snooping - FIPR releases

The Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Act is to be amended before it even comes into force to dramatically increase the number of official bodies that can access personal details of phone calls and emails. The Act was hugely controversial when it went through Parliament in 2000, with defeats for the Government in the Lords and significant changes being made to prevent its complete rejection.

Now the powers that were originally only given to the police, customs, secret services and the taxman are to be made available to a huge range of Government departments, local authorities, the NHS and even to Consignia (the Post Office).

Ian Brown, Director of FIPR commented, "I am appalled at this huge increase in the scope of Government snooping. Two years ago, we were deeply concerned that these powers were to be given to the police without any judicial oversight. Now they're handing them out to a practically endless queue of bureaucrats in Whitehall and Town Halls."

Read the full press release here

Posted by SteveC at 01:25 PM Mon 10 Jun 2002 Categories: FIPR releases , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
The RIP Act - The Guardian

'The RIP Act, which comes into force today, allows the government to intercept online communications. Julian Glover and Patrick Barkham examine the controversy surrounding the new act and the implications for privacy and e-commerce' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:27 PM Sun 24 Sep 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , Privacy , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
Take a tip m'lord - save cookie talk for teatime - The Observer

'...the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill winds its grisly way through the Upper House. The Bill is being shepherded through by a chap called Lord Bassam of Brighton, aided and abetted by a cove named Bach. Neither of them appears to know anything about the technology of the internet, though M'lord Bach seems to rely heavily on the advice of a Baroness Thornton, who in real life is Mrs John Carr, and thus the spouse of a well-known campaigner against child pornography on the internet. ' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:17 PM Sun 18 Jun 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , The Observer
Net tapping Bill fatally flawed - VNUNET

'A technical loophole that could render the Government's Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill (RIP) useless has been exposed' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:36 PM Fri 16 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
We won't read your emails - The Guardian

'The regulation of investigatory powers bill continues to be branded as a "massive extension of the state's power to spy on citizens" (Leader, June 12). This bill does not introduce new powers. It does, however, update the law enforcement agencies existing and highly regulated powers to fight organised criminals exploiting developing communications technology. A warrant, signed by the home secretary, will be needed to monitor emails in the same way one is needed now to monitor communications.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:37 PM Thu 15 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , RIP Oversight (Part IV) , The Guardian
Straw enters bitter row over RIP Bill - ZDNET

'In a week when the RIP Bill has been hit by increased and often bitter criticism, enter the Home Secretary to defend the government's plans, and criticise the British Chambers of Commerce's report' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:33 PM Thu 15 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , ZDNET
Data protection chief swipes out at spying Bill - ZDNET

'Britain's data protection commissioner Elizabeth France hit out at the government's controversial cyber-surveillance bill Wednesday.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:31 PM Wed 14 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , ZDNET
Lords to fight email tap bill - The Guardian

'The government's bill to allow MI5 access to encoded email last night faced the start of what may be a fatal drubbing from a cross-party coalition of peers concerned about both civil liberties and the security of business transactions.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:24 PM Tue 13 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Concern over U.K. e-mail surveillance bill grows - CNN

'A surveillance bill that would give the U.K. government sweeping powers to access e-mail and other encrypted Internet communications is coming under increasing criticism from companies and organizations as the bill heads for a vote in the House of Lords this week' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:22 PM Tue 13 Jun 2000 Categories: CNN , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
Why papers won't say our freedom is in peril - The Observer

'Did you know that the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill, in similar transition, hands MI5 the right to intercept any private email it chooses, without even prior clearance from a judge? Have you thought what that will mean for journalists' sources or for your own privacy?' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:10 PM Sun 11 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Observer
Your privacy ends here - The Observer

'When you wake on Thursday 5 October next, you will find yourself living in a different country. An ancient bulwark of English law - the principle that someone is presumed innocent until proven guilty - will have been overturned. And that is just for starters. From that date also the police and security services will enjoy sweeping powers to snoop on your email traffic and web use without let or hindrance from the Commissioner for Data Protection.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:45 PM Sun 4 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Observer
Hooked on secrecy - The Guardian

'The Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill extends existing bugging and tapping powers to all forms of communication, including mobile phones, emails and pictures sent electronically. The police would find it much easier to acquire data, including addresses of emails sent and received as well as websites hit and browsed by journalists, who could then no longer guarantee the security and identity of their sources.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:43 PM Thu 1 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Private means - The Guardian

'Our rulers invite us to believe that our safety is their over-riding consideration and that they therefore fight a lonely fight, day in, day out, against crime, drugs and a host of other menaces, such as people from other countries wanting to live here. They tell us that they can and will beat these things but that it will need eternal vigilance on their part and complete subordination on ours. For these threats to be overcome, the state must know everything about us and we must know nothing about the state. And if we're not happy with the relationship, it can only be supposed either that we have no regard for the safety of our children, or that we are up to no good ourselves.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:31 PM Sat 27 May 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Watching while you surf - BBC

'The UK is leading the world when it comes to high-tech spying on its citizens, say civil liberty and privacy groups.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:24 PM Thu 25 May 2000 Categories: BBC , Privacy , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
UK government forces through net spy bill - VNUNET

'The UK government is bracing itself for a major fight in the Lords over the cost and scope of legislation forcing ISPs to give police access to customers' internet traffic.'

Posted by SteveC at 03:53 PM Wed 10 May 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
Cyber-snooping Bill through House of Commons - ZDNET

'Sadly inadequate' RIP bill is branded by some MPs 'a ridiculous effort and a shame on Britain's long standing human rights record' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:47 PM Tue 9 May 2000 Categories: Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , ZDNET
Delays hit email privacy law - VNUNET

'A new law that gives police the power to intercept emails could be delayed, due to disputes in Parliament about whether or not net users should have to prove their innocence.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:15 PM Wed 26 Apr 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
New law opens up private data to MI5 - VNUNET

'Users attending the fifth Scrambling for Safety conference last week were in for a shock when they gathered in London to debate the UK government's draft legislation on bugging communications.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:29 AM Fri 31 Mar 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
Snooping powers could harm cheap net access - VNUNET

'Tumbling internet access charges in the UK could be abruptly halted if the government forces ISPs to maintain expensive email interception facilities. Under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Bill, the government wants police agencies to have more control over electronic communications, including the power to intercept email.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:14 AM Fri 24 Mar 2000 Categories: RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
NTK lead - NTK

'On Monday, the REGULATION OF INVESTIGATORY POWERS BILL will get its second reading in the Commons. Then it goes to committee, then it becomes law, and then you'll never hear from it again, because talking about most of its powers will get you five years in prison. So, when the police ask your ISP to put a tap on your mail, you won't hear about it. When your local trades and standards officer decides to take a look at your browser log for the last month, you won't hear about it. And when they come and get your private encryption key so that can read your friend's mails, you won't be able to tell your friend - or us - that it happened. Hell, you won't even be able to change your key if that might give us a clue.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:56 PM Fri 3 Mar 2000 Categories: NTK , Privacy , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)