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December 2000 Archives

Cybercrime treaty condemned - BBC

'A draft European treaty on cybercrime has been condemned as "appalling" by civil liberty groups around the globe.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:23 PM Mon 18 Dec 2000 Categories: BBC , Cybercrime , Surveillance & Security
Firms 'should allow personal e-mails' - BBC

'TUC general secretary John Monks said recent regulations, giving employers sweeping powers to monitor their workers' e-mails and internet activity, had left many people worried that managers might be "snooping" on their personal e-mails.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:43 PM Sun 17 Dec 2000 Categories: BBC , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
Press send to censor - BBC

'A majority of companies will soon be monitoring employee e-mails in a bid to stop their reputation being damaged by inappropriate messages.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:18 PM Fri 15 Dec 2000 Categories: BBC , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Surveillance & Security
Encryption tears holes in RIP - The Register

'A group of cryptographers think they have found a way to defeat the RIP Act, by making it impossible to hand over the keys to encrypted information.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:16 PM Thu 7 Dec 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , Surveillance & Security , Technical countermeasures , The Register
Govt ministers distance themselves from email spy plan - The Register

'Government ministers are distancing themselves from the Draconian surveillance measures proposed by NCIS deputy Roger Gaspar in a report to the Home Office.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:10 PM Tue 5 Dec 2000 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Surveillance & Security , The Register
Omagh bombing cited by agencies demanding access to all phone calls - The Guardian

'The security and intelligence agencies are using difficulties in pursuing the perpetrators of the Omagh bombing in August 1998 in their demand for access to records of every phone call made in Britain.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:09 PM Tue 5 Dec 2000 Categories: Cybercrime , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Surveillance & Security , The Guardian
Politicians line up against Euro email snooping laws - The Register

'A British politician is to warn her colleagues that proposals currently being drawn up to tackle cybercrime could lead to a Europe-wide version of the UK's controversial email snooping powers.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:07 PM Mon 4 Dec 2000 Categories: Cybercrime , Surveillance & Security , The Register
E-mail spy powers 'necessary' - BBC

'Powers for the police and other law enforcement agencies to snoop on e-mails, telephone calls and internet traffic must be granted in order to combat modern crime, a senior intelligence officer has warned.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:05 PM Mon 4 Dec 2000 Categories: BBC , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Surveillance & Security
Police request right to spy on every UK phone call and email - The Register

'A report by the deputy director-general of the National Criminal Intelligence Service - sent to the Home Office and leaked to the Observer newspaper - has shocked many by asking for the legal right to access records of all phone calls, emails and Internet dial-ups made in the UK for a period of up to seven years.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:03 PM Mon 4 Dec 2000 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Surveillance & Security , The Register
Spies seek access to all phone, email and net links - The Guardian

'The security and intelligence agencies are demanding the right to access records of every phone call, email, and internet connection made in Britain, the Home Office confirmed yesterday.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:00 PM Mon 4 Dec 2000 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Surveillance & Security , The Guardian
Spy plans 'threat to human rights' - BBC

'Civil liberties campaigners have warned the government that granting police and secret services greater snooping powers would be a breach of human rights.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:59 PM Sun 3 Dec 2000 Categories: BBC , Human Rights , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Surveillance & Security
Spied on from cradle to grave - The Observer

'For a decade, the world has been dazzled by the possibilities of information technology, but beside the opportunities lie new dangers. IT opens up avenues of communication, but it also opens avenues of government control. The British, with a tradition of an unwritten constitution, executive power and few automatic rights, are the most exposed of all. Today, we disclose confidential advice offered by the National Criminal Intelligence Service to the Home Office. It argues that in order to fight contemporary crime, they must fight fire with fire. They want to store every telephone call (including mobile) and every email made in a huge government-run data warehouse for seven years to allow them to run electronic checks in support of any criminal investigation they might make. Although they recognise the civil liberties implications of what they demand, they claim that fighting crime is impossible without access to cyberspace in this way.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:57 PM Sun 3 Dec 2000 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Surveillance & Security , The Observer
Secret plan to spy on all British phone calls - The Observer

'Britain's intelligence services are seeking powers to seize all records of telephone calls, emails and internet connections made by every person living in this country.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:55 PM Sun 3 Dec 2000 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Surveillance & Security , The Observer
Why that joke email could get you the sack - The Guardian

'They were not even very good jokes. Certainly not the sort of thing you would send to your mother, but exactly the same as thousands of other smutty emails that whizz their way round the computers of Britain's offices every day.

But for Rupert Beverley and David Pennington, who worked for an engineering company in Huddersfield, forwarding the messages to colleagues was the worst mistake they ever made. Earlier this month an industrial tribunal unanimously rejected their claim for unfair dismissal. It found the company was perfectly within its rights to sack them not only for sending the emails - but more worryingly for the thousands of workers whose in-boxes are filled with personal mail - for the amount of time wasted in the process.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:53 PM Sat 2 Dec 2000 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian