Surveillance and security news archive
> Home
> About
> Policy Work
> Trust in E-commerce and E-government
> Surveillance and security
> News
> News by category/date
> Intellectual property and the public domain
> International law and the Internet
> Academic freedom
> Achievements
> Friends of FIPR
> Events
> Contact FIPR

Archives for 'The Observer' category.

Our missing million - The Observer

'The reason why a national identity card could be a fiasco to compare with the Child Support Agency is the same reason why the population of Manchester jumped by 29,500 last week, why 800,000 healthy young men vanished in the 1990s and why serious newspapers should stop treating the results of opinion polls as facts. A significant minority of the public is refusing to co-operate with officialdom. Every variety of survey and poll is being affected, says Professor Roger Jowell, the former director of the British Social Attitudes Survey, now at City University, London. 'It used to be when you said you were doing something for the Government, people would feel they had a duty to co-operate. Now they say "screw you".' link

Posted by SteveC at 09:43 PM Mon 10 Nov 2003 Categories: ID Cards , Surveillance & Security , The Observer
Identity crisis - The Observer

'Most of us, if asked, would be willing to sacrifice a degree of liberty in the cause of security. But, in a democratic nation, the balance between the two is delicate. A national identity card, vastly extending the state's knowledge of every citizen, would destroy that balance.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:39 PM Sun 12 Oct 2003 Categories: ID Cards , The Observer
Ministers to dump 'useless' identity card - The Observer

'Downing Street is set to dump controversial proposals to force everyone in Britain to have an identity card, after new evidence revealed that the scheme would be 'close to useless' in the fight against terrorism.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:38 PM Sun 12 Oct 2003 Categories: ID Cards , The Observer
Police to spy on all emails - The Observer

'Millions of personal emails, other internet information and telephone records are to be made accessible to the police and intelligence services in a move that has been denounced by critics as one of the most wide-ranging extensions of state power over private information.' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:47 PM Sun 9 Jun 2002 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Observer
Beware - you've got mail - The Observer

'You are sitting at your desk. Your computer boings and the 'You have New Mail/Open Mail' icon appears. A friend who works downstairs in your office has sent an email with an attachment and copied it to everyone else who works in your team. Do you stop and think before you open it?' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:33 PM Sun 7 Jan 2001 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Surveillance & Security , The Observer
Spied on from cradle to grave - The Observer

'For a decade, the world has been dazzled by the possibilities of information technology, but beside the opportunities lie new dangers. IT opens up avenues of communication, but it also opens avenues of government control. The British, with a tradition of an unwritten constitution, executive power and few automatic rights, are the most exposed of all. Today, we disclose confidential advice offered by the National Criminal Intelligence Service to the Home Office. It argues that in order to fight contemporary crime, they must fight fire with fire. They want to store every telephone call (including mobile) and every email made in a huge government-run data warehouse for seven years to allow them to run electronic checks in support of any criminal investigation they might make. Although they recognise the civil liberties implications of what they demand, they claim that fighting crime is impossible without access to cyberspace in this way.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:57 PM Sun 3 Dec 2000 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Surveillance & Security , The Observer
Secret plan to spy on all British phone calls - The Observer

'Britain's intelligence services are seeking powers to seize all records of telephone calls, emails and internet connections made by every person living in this country.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:55 PM Sun 3 Dec 2000 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Surveillance & Security , The Observer
Every move you make, every breath you take... - The Observer

'From the moment you wake up tomorrow, nearly every movement you make will be tracked by somebody, somewhere. Walk to your car, turn on your computer at work, visit the local supermarket - all will be noted by cameras or databases deep in the bowels of corporate HQs and within shadowy government agencies.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:27 PM Sun 30 Jul 2000 Categories: Privacy , The Observer
Net firms set to flee RIP Bill - The Observer

'Claranet, the UK's largest independent Internet Service Provider, is poised to move parts of its telecoms infrastructure abroad to protect the communications traffic of its blue chip clients from potential vetting by the security services.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:25 PM Sun 30 Jul 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , The Observer
RIP to civil liberties and the e-business revolution - The Observer

'On Thursday, the British Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Bill completed its passage through the Lords, on its way to the Statute Book in October. Although their Lordships have done some sterling work in Committee, the Bill that now returns to the Lower House preserves intact its sinister essence as a spooks' charter.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:59 PM Sun 16 Jul 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , Privacy , The Observer
Climbdown on e-snooping Bill - The Observer

'A raft of amendments is expected to the highly controversial Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill which is currently passing through Parliament. Legal experts predict there will be more embarrassing climbdowns for the Government in the next few weeks.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:00 PM Sun 2 Jul 2000 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Observer
RIP could scupper our e-revolution - The Observer

'[...]But in any case the Bill will have minimal effect on crime because all but the most stupid criminals will simply switch to a foreign internet service provider for their emails, if necessary via a mobile phone. It already makes sense to host your website in the United States, not only because it's usually cheaper but also because the US constitution provides far greater legal protection than in the UK.[...]' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:25 PM Sun 25 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Surveillance & Security , The Observer
RIP could scupper our e-revolution - The Observer

'If John Carr really believes the opposition to the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill is Thatcherite, Úlitist and anti-democratic, perhaps he should get out more. But in any case the Bill will have minimal effect on crime because all but the most stupid criminals will simply switch to a foreign internet service provider for their emails, if necessary via a mobile phone.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:51 PM Sun 25 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Observer
Big browser is watching the web - The Observer

'Type a few words into a web search-engine and you can find information on any subject in seconds. What happens next depends what one is thinking about and one's reaction to that information. RIP's proponents say the internet is like a public space, and just as the police don't need a judge's warrant merely to keep any eye on someone in the street, they must be allowed to track any person's movements as they click from website to website.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:49 PM Sun 25 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Observer
Take a tip m'lord - save cookie talk for teatime - The Observer

'...the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill winds its grisly way through the Upper House. The Bill is being shepherded through by a chap called Lord Bassam of Brighton, aided and abetted by a cove named Bach. Neither of them appears to know anything about the technology of the internet, though M'lord Bach seems to rely heavily on the advice of a Baroness Thornton, who in real life is Mrs John Carr, and thus the spouse of a well-known campaigner against child pornography on the internet. ' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:17 PM Sun 18 Jun 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , The Observer
Net watchdog Bill faces axe - The Observer

'Jack Straw's much criticised Bill to regulate the freedom of the internet is facing disaster in the Lords as critics organise a guerrilla campaign against the Government.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:11 PM Sun 18 Jun 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , Privacy , The Observer
Our zero privacy - The Observer

'What ever you do where ever you go, they're watching you. And now they'll be reading your emails too' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:07 PM Sun 18 Jun 2000 Categories: Privacy , The Observer
New web spy system is not up to the job, say the experts - The Observer

'MI5 and the police faced embarrassment last night when electronics experts revealed that the new 'Big Brother' internet surveillance system - designed to enable them to monitor every internet user in the country - will not function properly.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:05 PM Sun 18 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Observer
Father of the web lashes snooping Bill - The Observer

'The computer scientist who invented the technologies which underpin the web told The Observer that the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill would stifle the development of the internet.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:13 PM Sun 11 Jun 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , The Observer
Why papers won't say our freedom is in peril - The Observer

'Did you know that the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill, in similar transition, hands MI5 the right to intercept any private email it chooses, without even prior clearance from a judge? Have you thought what that will mean for journalists' sources or for your own privacy?' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:10 PM Sun 11 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Observer
Your privacy ends here - The Observer

'When you wake on Thursday 5 October next, you will find yourself living in a different country. An ancient bulwark of English law - the principle that someone is presumed innocent until proven guilty - will have been overturned. And that is just for starters. From that date also the police and security services will enjoy sweeping powers to snoop on your email traffic and web use without let or hindrance from the Commissioner for Data Protection.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:45 PM Sun 4 Jun 2000 Categories: RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Observer
Coming to a screen near you - The Observer

'Get ready for a virus that will make last week's 'love bug' look laughable. Jason Burke and Nick Paton Walsh report on a fast-growing invisible menace to us all.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:42 PM Sun 7 May 2000 Categories: Cybercrime , The Observer
Jack Straw wants the keys to your office. Don't let him in ... - The Observer

'Big mistake. It's becoming clear that Straw & Co have no idea of the nightmare they are creating. Their screwball Bill is the product of a shambles in Whitehall over online regulation.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:41 PM Sun 16 Apr 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Observer