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Archives for 'Code of Practice' category.

Phone and e-mail 'snoopers' charter' is watered down - The Independent

'The Home Secretary admitted that he had blundered by drawing up plans last summer for what soon became known as a "snoopers' charter". The proposals, authorising Whitehall departments and local councils to access private information, have been watered down after opposition from civil liberties groups and computer professionals.' link

Posted by SteveC at 08:13 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , The Independent
Wide powers for state bodies in new 'snoopers' charter' - The Telegraph

'More than 24 state agencies and hundreds of local government officials will be given powers to demand the personal details of citizens under a revamped "snooper's charter" published yesterday.'link

Posted by SteveC at 08:11 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , The Telegraph
The 'snoopers' charter' explained - The Guardian

'What is the snoopers' charter? It's a plan to give state agencies access to your telephone, internet and email records. Data would include information including who you call on your mobile phone, and where you are calling from, and to whom and when you sent emails.' link

Posted by SteveC at 08:04 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , The Guardian
New limits may allay fears on snooping - The Guardian

'The proposals won a mixed response from civil liberties groups. John Wadham, the director of Liberty, said: "The original snooper's charter proposals were appallingly excessive. We welcome much of the government plan to step back from them. But authorities accessing this data should need a warrant from a judge - that's the only truly independent safeguard that can produce public confidence."' link

Posted by SteveC at 08:01 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , The Guardian
Fears persist as agencies get access to data - Financial Times

'The City regulator, the Office of Fair Trading and a host of other investigative bodies are set to have the power to access telephone and internet data following a review of the government's so-called "snoopers charter".' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:58 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Financial Times , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2)
Retention of communications data: Home Office consults - out-law.com

'The legislation does not oblige telcos and ISPs to retain data. However, it is worded such that if the industry doesn't accept a voluntary code of practice, the Government can make the retention requirement mandatory. And the views expressed within the industry have suggested that a voluntary Code will be rejected.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:50 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , out-law.com
RIP rethink doesn't go far - PC Plus

'Number of 'snoopers' reduced but no change to the six year logs' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:47 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , PC Plus , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2)
Ministers scale down 'snooper 's charter' - The Guardian

Officials had planned to allow a vast range of public bodies - including seven Whitehall departments, local councils and 11 quangos - the right to demand access to private communications records. link

Posted by SteveC at 04:42 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , The Guardian
British govt wants more snooping powers - TheStar

'Civil liberties groups have criticised the much publicised proposals, branding them a "snoopers' charter'' and the harbinger of an Orwellian state.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:37 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , TheStar
Licence to snoop - The Telegraph

'The Act has always been controversial. When the Home Office proposed extending it so that a huge range of government agencies and other public bodies, including local authorities, would be able to monitor our internet, email and telephone records with virtually no judicial control, all hell broke loose.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:34 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , The Telegraph
Government outlines data retention plans - VNUNET

'Under the government proposals, mobile operators and internet service providers (ISPs) will be required to store information on users for up to 12 months. Details of who sent and received emails will need to be kept for six months.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:27 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
Data retention in the UK: It's a whole new ball game... - Silicon.com

'The UK government is scaling down its data retention plans in a renewed effort to quell public and industry disquiet, but even the new 'softer' policies have met with a mixed response, with one prominent think-tank labelling them a "sham".' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:13 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Silicon.com
Cautious response to 'snoop' plans - BBC

"I would have expected rock sold commitments but instead the government is saying 'let's have another debate'. I'd have thought we were beyond that and now we seem to be back to square one," - Simon Davies, Head of Privacy International link

Posted by SteveC at 04:54 PM Tue 11 Mar 2003 Categories: BBC , Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2)
Home Office set to release consultation papers - Govt. Consultations

After backing down on the draconian proposals last summer the Home Office is set to release two consulation papers today at 11am. 'Access to communications data - respecting privacy and protecting the public from crime' and 'A consultation paper on a code of practice for voluntary retention of communications data' should be available after 11.

Posted by SteveC at 12:38 AM Tue 11 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations
Home Office 'tones down' data regulation plans - EuropeMedia.net

'In June 2002, following intense pressure from the media and civil liberties groups, the Home Secretary David Blunkett was forced to shelve a controversial draft order extending the reach of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 (RIPA) to public authorities.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:28 AM Tue 11 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , EuropeMedia.net , Govt. Consultations
Are your staff surfing safely? - VNUNET

Are your staff surfing safely?- ...the Home
Office has promised to publish a code of practice covering RIP [wrong
- not about this]
, its publication has been delayed....George
Gardiner, senior partner at solicitors Buchanan Ingersol...called on the
Home Office [??!!] to delay publication of the
code no longer than is strictly necessary.

Posted by SteveC at 01:03 PM Mon 9 Apr 2001 Categories: Code of Practice , Cybercrime , RIP Oversight (Part IV) , VNUNET
Snooping code delay until end of the year - Financial Times

Snooping code delay until end of the year- Iain Bourne, strategic policy manager at the Information Commission, said: "We got a lot of very detailed submissions, some of which were longer than the code itself. The code was supposed to colour in the skeletal outline of the law. Some thought it went beyond that." The commission will now take expert advice before publishing the final version of the code, "hopefully by the end of the year," Mr Bourne added.....The delay risks leaving both employers and staff in legal limbo. Sarah Veale, senior policy officer at the Trades Union Congress, said: "A lot of us were relying on the code to clarify when the right to privacy protects the employee . . . we need it to help employers, as much as employees. If we're not going to have a code (this year), then if someone is unfairly treated it means we may have to go to court. That's got to be the inevitable consequence." The Confederation of British Industry said it hoped the delay reflected a "fundamental rethink" of the code. "Our response (to the commission) contained a number of very serious objections to the code. We said it was too complicated and too long and that some parts, such as e-mail, were unworkable," said Rod Armitage, head of legal affairs.

Posted by SteveC at 01:10 PM Thu 5 Apr 2001 Categories: Code of Practice , Financial Times , Govt. Consultations