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Archives for 'Govt. Consultations' category.

Home Office snooping plans are almost unchanged - FIPR releases

'In June 2002 the Home Office backed down in the face of the outrage that greeted their totally disproportionate proposals for access to communications data (records of email senders and receivers, phone numbers called or web pages visited). Last week they gave the impression of a change of heart, yet closer examination of the detail of their proposals shows that their plans are almost entirely unchanged.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:20 PM Mon 15 Sep 2003 Categories: FIPR releases , Govt. Consultations , Privacy , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2)
'Snoopers' charter' backs council spies - The Times

'COUNCILS will have powers to run undercover agents and secret surveillance to halt fraud or crime under government proposal' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:07 PM Mon 15 Sep 2003 Categories: Data retention , Govt. Consultations , RIP Oversight (Part IV) , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2) , The Times
Regulation of Investigatory Powers (Communications Data) Order 2003 - Govt. Consultations

Consultation Paper on a Code of Practice for Voluntary Retention of Communications Data (under the Anti-Terrorism Crime and Security Act 2001) Response to the Consultation Paper. Access to Communications Data ? respecting privacy and protecting the public from crime Response to the Consultation Paper

Posted by SteveC at 11:46 AM Fri 12 Sep 2003 Categories: Data retention , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2)
Public oppose ID card scheme - BBC

'The UK Government has finally admitted that the public are overwhelmingly opposed to the idea of a national ID card.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:00 PM Thu 19 Jun 2003 Categories: BBC , Govt. Consultations , ID Cards
Government accused of deception over ID card statistics - out-law.com

'The UK Government claims that its plans for a national identity card have won public support. But its consultation results seem to ignore most of the responses and the Government refuses to explain why, according to human rights group Privacy International.' link

Posted by SteveC at 01:37 PM Fri 6 Jun 2003 Categories: Govt. Consultations , Human Rights , out-law.com
Business rejects EU data law plans - ComputerWeekly.com

'"We are not convinced law enforcement agencies understand how much data they'll have to deal with." Farrell said the coalition was opposed to data retention but supported data preservation where law enforcement agencies could ask a service provider to preserve data on a specified customer rather than for everyone.' link

Posted by SteveC at 01:44 PM Thu 5 Jun 2003 Categories: ComputerWeekly.com , Data retention , Govt. Consultations
What David did next - The Guardian

After the furore over data protection last year, SA Mathieson explores the government's designs on our movements in the digital world link

Posted by SteveC at 12:46 PM Fri 25 Apr 2003 Categories: Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2) , The Guardian
Tory peers move to block snoopers' bill - The Guardian

'Lord Strathcylde, the Tory leader in the Lords, is prepared to obstruct government secondary legislation to stop what is seen as an infringe ment of civil liberties. The government plans that every local authority and a number of other public bodies and quangos will have access to phone, email and internet data, though not the content of these communications.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:19 AM Thu 20 Mar 2003 Categories: Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , The Guardian
How to avoid the online snoopers - BBC

'Where is the line to be drawn when it comes to protecting privacy and respected the law in the digital world, asks technology consultant Bill Thompson.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:02 AM Sun 16 Mar 2003 Categories: BBC , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2)
Disproportionate costs - The Inquirer

'This week saw the Home Office launch two consultations on communications data. The first covers access to communications data under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act (RIPA) - this is the revision to the set of proposals to allow everyone from the food safety people to the local parish council to see your data if they wanted to. The second is the voluntary code of practice for data retention under the Anti-Terrorism, Crime and Security Act (ATCS) - this is the bit about what data must be kept.' link

Posted by SteveC at 01:57 AM Sun 16 Mar 2003 Categories: Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2) , The Inquirer
Phone and e-mail 'snoopers' charter' is watered down - The Independent

'The Home Secretary admitted that he had blundered by drawing up plans last summer for what soon became known as a "snoopers' charter". The proposals, authorising Whitehall departments and local councils to access private information, have been watered down after opposition from civil liberties groups and computer professionals.' link

Posted by SteveC at 08:13 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , The Independent
Wide powers for state bodies in new 'snoopers' charter' - The Telegraph

'More than 24 state agencies and hundreds of local government officials will be given powers to demand the personal details of citizens under a revamped "snooper's charter" published yesterday.'link

Posted by SteveC at 08:11 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , The Telegraph
The 'snoopers' charter' explained - The Guardian

'What is the snoopers' charter? It's a plan to give state agencies access to your telephone, internet and email records. Data would include information including who you call on your mobile phone, and where you are calling from, and to whom and when you sent emails.' link

Posted by SteveC at 08:04 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , The Guardian
New limits may allay fears on snooping - The Guardian

'The proposals won a mixed response from civil liberties groups. John Wadham, the director of Liberty, said: "The original snooper's charter proposals were appallingly excessive. We welcome much of the government plan to step back from them. But authorities accessing this data should need a warrant from a judge - that's the only truly independent safeguard that can produce public confidence."' link

Posted by SteveC at 08:01 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , The Guardian
Fears persist as agencies get access to data - Financial Times

'The City regulator, the Office of Fair Trading and a host of other investigative bodies are set to have the power to access telephone and internet data following a review of the government's so-called "snoopers charter".' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:58 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Financial Times , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2)
Retention of communications data: Home Office consults - out-law.com

'The legislation does not oblige telcos and ISPs to retain data. However, it is worded such that if the industry doesn't accept a voluntary code of practice, the Government can make the retention requirement mandatory. And the views expressed within the industry have suggested that a voluntary Code will be rejected.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:50 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , out-law.com
RIP rethink doesn't go far - PC Plus

'Number of 'snoopers' reduced but no change to the six year logs' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:47 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , PC Plus , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2)
Ministers scale down 'snooper 's charter' - The Guardian

Officials had planned to allow a vast range of public bodies - including seven Whitehall departments, local councils and 11 quangos - the right to demand access to private communications records. link

Posted by SteveC at 04:42 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , The Guardian
British govt wants more snooping powers - TheStar

'Civil liberties groups have criticised the much publicised proposals, branding them a "snoopers' charter'' and the harbinger of an Orwellian state.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:37 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , TheStar
Licence to snoop - The Telegraph

'The Act has always been controversial. When the Home Office proposed extending it so that a huge range of government agencies and other public bodies, including local authorities, would be able to monitor our internet, email and telephone records with virtually no judicial control, all hell broke loose.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:34 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , The Telegraph
Government outlines data retention plans - VNUNET

'Under the government proposals, mobile operators and internet service providers (ISPs) will be required to store information on users for up to 12 months. Details of who sent and received emails will need to be kept for six months.' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:27 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
Data retention in the UK: It's a whole new ball game... - Silicon.com

'The UK government is scaling down its data retention plans in a renewed effort to quell public and industry disquiet, but even the new 'softer' policies have met with a mixed response, with one prominent think-tank labelling them a "sham".' link

Posted by SteveC at 04:13 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , Silicon.com
Home Office in two minds on snooping - FIPR releases

'In June 2002 the Foundation for Information Policy Research (FIPR) was the first to draw attention to the Government's totally disproportionate proposals for access to communications data (records of email senders and receivers, phone numbers called or web pages visited). The Home Office apparently intended for every Whitehall or Town Hall bureaucrat to have access to this highly sensitive data. They now admit this was "not proportionate" and have set out schemes for limiting the type of data that might be accessed and the controls that might be applied.' Read the full FIPR release here

Posted by SteveC at 04:11 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: FIPR releases , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , RIP Oversight (Part IV) , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2)
Cautious response to 'snoop' plans - BBC

"I would have expected rock sold commitments but instead the government is saying 'let's have another debate'. I'd have thought we were beyond that and now we seem to be back to square one," - Simon Davies, Head of Privacy International link

Posted by SteveC at 04:54 PM Tue 11 Mar 2003 Categories: BBC , Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2)
Home Office set to release consultation papers - Govt. Consultations

After backing down on the draconian proposals last summer the Home Office is set to release two consulation papers today at 11am. 'Access to communications data - respecting privacy and protecting the public from crime' and 'A consultation paper on a code of practice for voluntary retention of communications data' should be available after 11.

Posted by SteveC at 12:38 AM Tue 11 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Govt. Consultations
Home Office 'tones down' data regulation plans - EuropeMedia.net

'In June 2002, following intense pressure from the media and civil liberties groups, the Home Secretary David Blunkett was forced to shelve a controversial draft order extending the reach of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 (RIPA) to public authorities.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:28 AM Tue 11 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , EuropeMedia.net , Govt. Consultations
UK government neuters its invasions of privacy - The Inquirer

THE MUCH REVILED Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act (RIPa) had been due to be updated to allow all kinds of civil servants access to invade UK citizens privacy almost at whim. Now, according to the Guardian, David Blunkett has done a u-turn following deep public unease. link

Posted by SteveC at 07:39 PM Wed 26 Feb 2003 Categories: Govt. Consultations , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2) , The Inquirer
Blunkett u-turn on data privacy plans - The Guardian

David Blunkett, the home secretary, has bowed to intense public concern over the privacy of electronic communications and radically redrawn plans to give a host of state agencies and local authorities the power to access telephone, internet and email records. link

Posted by SteveC at 11:32 AM Wed 26 Feb 2003 Categories: Govt. Consultations , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2) , The Guardian
UK stands firm on snooping laws - Reports/Equiries

UK stands firm on snooping laws - The UK Government is determined to push ahead with its plans for internet snooping despite mounting opposition.

Posted by SteveC at 04:10 PM Thu 30 Jan 2003 Categories: BBC , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , RIP Oversight (Part IV) , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2) , Reports/Equiries
APIG report complete - Reports/Equiries

The All Party Internet Group (APIG) inquiry into Government access to communications data has been released here. See also the oral and written evidence. Also APIG press notices.

Posted by SteveC at 03:56 PM Tue 28 Jan 2003 Categories: Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , RIP Oversight (Part IV) , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2) , Reports/Equiries
Rethink urged over net snooping laws - Govt. Consultations

Rethink urged over net snooping laws - "Net snooping laws in the UK are a mess"

Posted by SteveC at 03:42 PM Thu 19 Dec 2002 Categories: BBC , Govt. Consultations , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2)
Consultation on privacy promised for new year - Govt. Consultations

Consultation on privacy promised for new year

Posted by SteveC at 03:37 PM Thu 19 Dec 2002 Categories: Govt. Consultations , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2) , ZDNET
Blunkett shelves access to data plans - The Guardian

Blunkett shelves access to data plans - "Ministers were yesterday forced into a humiliating climbdown"

Posted by SteveC at 03:50 PM Wed 19 Jun 2002 Categories: Govt. Consultations , The Guardian
Blunkett admits error as he shelves 'snooper' Bill - The Independent

Blunkett admits error as he shelves 'snooper' Bill - 'Mr Blunkett said he would not now go ahead until a "broad public debate" had been held on privacy'

Posted by SteveC at 03:49 PM Wed 19 Jun 2002 Categories: Govt. Consultations , The Independent
Blunkett backs down over 'snoop' laws - RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2)

Blunkett backs down over 'snoop' laws - Home Office "blundered", backs off for consultation in new year

Posted by SteveC at 03:52 PM Tue 18 Jun 2002 Categories: BBC , Govt. Consultations , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2)
Snooping code delay until end of the year - Financial Times

Snooping code delay until end of the year- Iain Bourne, strategic policy manager at the Information Commission, said: "We got a lot of very detailed submissions, some of which were longer than the code itself. The code was supposed to colour in the skeletal outline of the law. Some thought it went beyond that." The commission will now take expert advice before publishing the final version of the code, "hopefully by the end of the year," Mr Bourne added.....The delay risks leaving both employers and staff in legal limbo. Sarah Veale, senior policy officer at the Trades Union Congress, said: "A lot of us were relying on the code to clarify when the right to privacy protects the employee . . . we need it to help employers, as much as employees. If we're not going to have a code (this year), then if someone is unfairly treated it means we may have to go to court. That's got to be the inevitable consequence." The Confederation of British Industry said it hoped the delay reflected a "fundamental rethink" of the code. "Our response (to the commission) contained a number of very serious objections to the code. We said it was too complicated and too long and that some parts, such as e-mail, were unworkable," said Rod Armitage, head of legal affairs.

Posted by SteveC at 01:10 PM Thu 5 Apr 2001 Categories: Code of Practice , Financial Times , Govt. Consultations
Government backtracks on encryption enquiry - ZDNET

Government backtracks on encryption enquiry-
Despite accepting its own taskforce
recommendation two weeks ago, the Home Office now says there will be no independent
enquiry into the effects of the controversial RIP Act...."The impact of
the Act should be looked at by an independent panel to see if the government
has got it right or not, rather than whether or not the industry is
happy" Yaman Akdeniz CRCL

Posted by SteveC at 01:12 PM Wed 4 Apr 2001 Categories: Govt. Consultations , Reports/Equiries , ZDNET
RIP interception rules still unclear - VNUNET

'The UK government plans to lengthen the consultation period for the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act, following confusion over companies' powers to intercept internal email.' link

Posted by SteveC at 01:22 PM Fri 25 Aug 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , Govt. Consultations , VNUNET
MP to launch RIP Bill inquiry - VNUNET

'The chairman of a cross-party information select committee is launching a parliamentary inquiry into the technical weaknesses of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Bill.' link

Posted by SteveC at 01:09 PM Wed 28 Jun 2000 Categories: Govt. Consultations , Reports/Equiries , VNUNET
Cyber-snooping Bill through House of Commons - ZDNET

'Sadly inadequate' RIP bill is branded by some MPs 'a ridiculous effort and a shame on Britain's long standing human rights record' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:47 PM Tue 9 May 2000 Categories: Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , ZDNET
NTK 2000-05-05 - NTK

'Oh, and we also love Nick Palmer MP, who claimed on Channel Four news that plans were already far advanced for a law that would stop ILOVEYOU ever happening again. Yes, it's that darn RIP bill, still struggling to find supporters in the real world.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:35 PM Fri 5 May 2000 Categories: Govt. Consultations , NTK
Critics launch fresh attack on RIP Bill - VNUNET

'The UK government will come under attack again on Monday at the third reading of its controversial Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:24 PM Fri 5 May 2000 Categories: Govt. Consultations , VNUNET
NTK 2000-04-28 - NTK

'Third reading is on May 8th. Let's see if the government can find someone who actually likes the new law by then' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:52 PM Fri 28 Apr 2000 Categories: Govt. Consultations , NTK
Industry slams cost of UK snooping bill - VNUNET

'Critics have slammed an independent report into the UK government's proposed communications snooping bill which puts an estimated 34m price tag on the bill's implementation.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:48 PM Wed 26 Apr 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , Govt. Consultations , VNUNET
Wiretapping may cost ISPs 17m - report - ZDNET

'Wiretapping the Internet -- in accordance with the government's controversial Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Bill -- will cost Britain's 400 ISPs at least 17m in the first year, with the total cost to both ISPs and the government rising to around 30m according to a report published Thursday.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:45 PM Wed 26 Apr 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , Govt. Consultations , ZDNET
Website campaign to derail legislation - BBC

'Stand.org.uk, comprising e-commerce entrepreneurs and new media thinkers, say that the public has sent more than 1,500 faxes from its website to MPs within two weeks of the launch of their new campaign against the bill.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:31 PM Fri 31 Mar 2000 Categories: BBC , Govt. Consultations , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III)
It's RIP basic human rights in 'worst UK legislation ever' looms - The Guardian

'To LSE for a conference on the Interior Ministry's Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Bill, currently in Committee in the Mother of Parliaments. Readers of this column will know that, among other things, this odious piece of legislation reverses the ancient principle of natural justice that says that a person should be pre sumed innocent until proven guilty.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:22 AM Sun 26 Mar 2000 Categories: Govt. Consultations , Human Rights , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
NTK 2000-03-24 - NTK

Like a supply teacher late for his first class, Charles Clarke, Home Office minister in charge of Not Being Scared by The Crypto Freaks, looked most put out by the giggling during his speech at Wednesday's SCRAMBLING FOR SAFETY. Whenever he tried to praise the work done by the experts in the audience, the experts laughed - and not in a nice, self-deprecatory way.

Posted by SteveC at 12:18 AM Fri 24 Mar 2000 Categories: Govt. Consultations , NTK , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III)
Ripping into U.K. Privacy Bill - Wired News

'LONDON -- Privacy advocates say a proposed bill that could force Internet service providers hand over data traffic information would harm Britain's e-commerce environment and encourage e-business companies to locate elsewhere. But in keeping with the heated tone the debate has taken, one government official attending a conference Wednesday at the London School of Economics claimed the bill would help "make the U.K. the best place in the world for e-commerce." ' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:11 AM Thu 23 Mar 2000 Categories: Govt. Consultations , Human Rights , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , Wired News
UK government answers snooping bill critics - VNUNET

'The Home Office minister in charge of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Bill has publicly defended the controversial legislation against accusations that it breeches human rights.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:09 AM Thu 23 Mar 2000 Categories: Govt. Consultations , Human Rights , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , VNUNET
RIP Bill comes under fresh attack - ZDNET

'On the eve of a privacy conference, two leading human rights organisations have accused the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill of violating human rights laws. A forthcoming government bill concerning Internet communication directly contravenes the European Convention of Human Rights, according to a report published on Wednesday by leading civil liberty rights groups.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:05 AM Wed 22 Mar 2000 Categories: Govt. Consultations , Human Rights , ZDNET
Industry tackles UK government over snooping bill - VNUNET

'Industry groups and encryption users will today get their first chance to grill UK government ministers and Home Office officials in public about the controversial communications snooping bill.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:03 AM Wed 22 Mar 2000 Categories: Govt. Consultations , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , VNUNET