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Archives for 'Financial Times' category.

Blunkett struggles to keep ID cards on agenda - Financial Times

'David Blunkett is struggling to salvage his controversial scheme for compulsory identity cards as the cabinet remains split over the issue.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:57 PM Mon 13 Oct 2003 Categories: Financial Times , ID Cards
Fears persist as agencies get access to data - Financial Times

'The City regulator, the Office of Fair Trading and a host of other investigative bodies are set to have the power to access telephone and internet data following a review of the government's so-called "snoopers charter".' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:58 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: Code of Practice , Financial Times , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2)
Push to level the playing field - Financial Times


Push to level the playing field

Posted by SteveC at 01:00 PM Tue 10 Apr 2001 Categories: Financial Times
Snooping code delay until end of the year - Financial Times

Snooping code delay until end of the year- Iain Bourne, strategic policy manager at the Information Commission, said: "We got a lot of very detailed submissions, some of which were longer than the code itself. The code was supposed to colour in the skeletal outline of the law. Some thought it went beyond that." The commission will now take expert advice before publishing the final version of the code, "hopefully by the end of the year," Mr Bourne added.....The delay risks leaving both employers and staff in legal limbo. Sarah Veale, senior policy officer at the Trades Union Congress, said: "A lot of us were relying on the code to clarify when the right to privacy protects the employee . . . we need it to help employers, as much as employees. If we're not going to have a code (this year), then if someone is unfairly treated it means we may have to go to court. That's got to be the inevitable consequence." The Confederation of British Industry said it hoped the delay reflected a "fundamental rethink" of the code. "Our response (to the commission) contained a number of very serious objections to the code. We said it was too complicated and too long and that some parts, such as e-mail, were unworkable," said Rod Armitage, head of legal affairs.

Posted by SteveC at 01:10 PM Thu 5 Apr 2001 Categories: Code of Practice , Financial Times , Govt. Consultations
Thriving communications pose new legal implications - Financial Times


Thriving communications pose new legal implications

Posted by SteveC at 01:47 PM Fri 30 Mar 2001 Categories: Financial Times
IMRG opinion - Spam - E-mail's foot-and-mouth - Financial Times


IMRG opinion - Spam - E-mail's foot-and-mouth

Posted by SteveC at 01:48 PM Thu 29 Mar 2001 Categories: Financial Times
Editorial comment: Spies in the web - Financial Times

'Big Brother only had television cameras to spy into our living rooms. Today's governments have computers, with power far beyond anything imagined by George Orwell in his chilling novel 1984. But to make best use of their surveillance of internet data, they need to have the keys to the encryption systems now routinely used to defend privacy. Yesterday Jack Straw introduced a bill in Britain's House of (Commons that would give the authorities more intrusive powers than in any other western democracy.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:08 PM Mon 6 Mar 2000 Categories: Financial Times , Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III)