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Archives for 'FIPR releases' category.

Scrambling for Safety 7 - FIPR releases

The London School of Economics will host a public meeting on Wednesday 22 October to assess proposed government legislation to retain and snoop on information about the phone and Internet activity of everyone in the UK.

Entry is free. RSVP to simon@privacy.org

2.15pm ? 5.00pm, Wednesday 22 October 2003

New Theatre, East Building, London School of Economics, Houghton Street, London WC2

more info

Posted by SteveC at 05:35 PM Thu 2 Oct 2003 Categories: Events , FIPR releases , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2)
Home Office snooping plans are almost unchanged - FIPR releases

'In June 2002 the Home Office backed down in the face of the outrage that greeted their totally disproportionate proposals for access to communications data (records of email senders and receivers, phone numbers called or web pages visited). Last week they gave the impression of a change of heart, yet closer examination of the detail of their proposals shows that their plans are almost entirely unchanged.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:20 PM Mon 15 Sep 2003 Categories: FIPR releases , Govt. Consultations , Privacy , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2)
FIPR response to the retention of communications data consultation - FIPR releases

'...We therefore strongly urge that the Home Office drop all plans for retention and allow the powers to require it to lapse on 13 December 2003 under s.105 of ATCS. They should follow the lead of the US Federal Bureau of Investigation and rely instead on data preservation powers.'

Read the full response

Posted by SteveC at 01:29 PM Fri 30 May 2003 Categories: Data retention , FIPR releases
Home Office in two minds on snooping - FIPR releases

'In June 2002 the Foundation for Information Policy Research (FIPR) was the first to draw attention to the Government's totally disproportionate proposals for access to communications data (records of email senders and receivers, phone numbers called or web pages visited). The Home Office apparently intended for every Whitehall or Town Hall bureaucrat to have access to this highly sensitive data. They now admit this was "not proportionate" and have set out schemes for limiting the type of data that might be accessed and the controls that might be applied.' Read the full FIPR release here

Posted by SteveC at 04:11 PM Wed 12 Mar 2003 Categories: FIPR releases , Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , RIP Oversight (Part IV) , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2)
FIPR welcomes Government rethink on snooping powers - FIPR releases

FIPR welcomes Government rethink on snooping powers

Posted by SteveC at 03:29 PM Tue 18 Jun 2002 Categories: FIPR releases
FIPR welcomes Government rethink on snooping powers - FIPR releases

The Home Office is reported to have postponed its proposals to amend the Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Act to allow a huge increase in the official that can access personal details of phone calls and emails.

Attention was first drawn to the highly technical Regulations encapsulating this change by an FIPR Press Release on 10th June. The story has since become headline news and the Government has now decided not to proceed with these changes.

Ian Brown, Director of FIPR welcomed this news, "these proposals were poorly considered, poorly justified and over the past week have been condemned by almost everyone outside of Whitehall. The Home Office must now tear them up and start again from first principles."

He continued, "we are as keen as anyone else in seeing wrongdoing investigated, but we don't think that handing out such wide-reaching powers to every bureaucrat in the land is compatible with living in a free society. The Government needs to carefully consider whether self-authorisation can ever be appropriate for this type of invasion of privacy and they need to pay a lot more attention to the oversight regime. An Interception Commissioner who doesn't have the resources to open all his mail is no credible way to ensure that abuse is detected."

Read the full press release here

Posted by SteveC at 01:24 PM Tue 18 Jun 2002 Categories: Data retention , FIPR releases , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2)
FIPR Appalled by Huge Increase in Government Snooping - FIPR releases

FIPR Appalled by Huge Increase in Government Snooping

Posted by SteveC at 03:32 PM Mon 10 Jun 2002 Categories: FIPR releases
FIPR appalled by huge increase in Government snooping - FIPR releases

The Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Act is to be amended before it even comes into force to dramatically increase the number of official bodies that can access personal details of phone calls and emails. The Act was hugely controversial when it went through Parliament in 2000, with defeats for the Government in the Lords and significant changes being made to prevent its complete rejection.

Now the powers that were originally only given to the police, customs, secret services and the taxman are to be made available to a huge range of Government departments, local authorities, the NHS and even to Consignia (the Post Office).

Ian Brown, Director of FIPR commented, "I am appalled at this huge increase in the scope of Government snooping. Two years ago, we were deeply concerned that these powers were to be given to the police without any judicial oversight. Now they're handing them out to a practically endless queue of bureaucrats in Whitehall and Town Halls."

Read the full press release here

Posted by SteveC at 01:25 PM Mon 10 Jun 2002 Categories: FIPR releases , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
More holes in net privacy - FIPR releases

Letter to the Guardian by Director Caspar Bowden:

'Charles Clarke's view of the regulation of the investigatory powers bill's decryption powers (Letters, March 10) is "we will only prosecute if you're guilty". Internet users manage a plethora of passwords to protect email, files, and website registrations. Failure to produce any password required by any public authority for any official purpose (S.46.2.b.ii) means two years' jail. The court will convict if it believes you were lying about forgetting a password, or uncooperative in finding it.

No evidence is needed of involvement in a substantive crime. Moreover, a lifetime gagging clause prevents telling what happened on penalty of a further five years (S.50). The data protection act mandates data controllers to take adequate precautions including encryption, so they are in jeopardy either way.'

Posted by SteveC at 11:51 PM Wed 15 Mar 2000 Categories: FIPR releases , Reverse of burden of proof
Government snooping will cost taxpayers millions - ZDNET

'Plans to seize encryption keys from crime suspects will leave them vulnerable to theft and misuse. Government snooping plans will cost the taxpayer "hundreds of millions" of pounds, according to a report published on Monday.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:50 PM Wed 1 Mar 2000 Categories: FIPR releases , Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , ZDNET