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May 2000 Archives

Government tapping of phone calls between UK and Ireland challenged - The Guardian

'The government is being taken to the European human rights court over allegations that the security and intelligence agencies have been engaged in the wholesale tapping of telephone conversations between Britain and Ireland.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:37 PM Wed 31 May 2000 Categories: Privacy , The Guardian
Private means - The Guardian

'Our rulers invite us to believe that our safety is their over-riding consideration and that they therefore fight a lonely fight, day in, day out, against crime, drugs and a host of other menaces, such as people from other countries wanting to live here. They tell us that they can and will beat these things but that it will need eternal vigilance on their part and complete subordination on ours. For these threats to be overcome, the state must know everything about us and we must know nothing about the state. And if we're not happy with the relationship, it can only be supposed either that we have no regard for the safety of our children, or that we are up to no good ourselves.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:31 PM Sat 27 May 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Watching while you surf - BBC

'The UK is leading the world when it comes to high-tech spying on its citizens, say civil liberty and privacy groups.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:24 PM Thu 25 May 2000 Categories: BBC , Privacy , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
All Kafka'd up - NUJ

'Let's get straight to a fable showing how the Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Bill 2000 could affect you. It's conveniently difficult to write a who-what-when intro about one of the most heavily obfuscated pieces of legislation the Journalist has had the misfortune to encounter. The Home Office says its purpose is to regulate email interception, human surveillance of suspects, and the like. But do read on...' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:20 PM Wed 24 May 2000 Categories: NUJ , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
Newspapers challenge widening of police, security agency powers - The Guardian

'The Guardian and the Observer will tomorrow challenge in the high court an order made by an Old Bailey judge to hand over any emails or notes the newspapers may possess relating to the MI5 renegade David Shayler.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:10 PM Mon 22 May 2000 Categories: Freedom of Information , The Guardian
Four threats to the public's right to know - The Guardian

'The freedom of information bill, now going through parliament, gives fewer rights to official information than those enjoyed by citizens of the US, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the Irish Republic. In some respects, the rights are weaker than those under the last Tory government's open government code.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:05 PM Mon 22 May 2000 Categories: Freedom of Information , Privacy , The Guardian
Is New Labour delivering on its ecommerce promises? - VNUNET

'According to a former UK Government press officer, New Labour's technique for getting ideas into UK citizens' heads is to repeat its slogans again, and again, and again.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:02 PM Fri 19 May 2000 Categories: Misc , VNUNET
New Internet spy agency to be set up in Britain - WSWS.org

'The British Labour government is planning to set up a new spy centre that can track all email and Internet communication, including encrypted messages.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:56 PM Thu 18 May 2000 Categories: Privacy , WSWS.org
New Internet spy agency to be set up in Britain - WSWS.org

'The Government Technical Assistance Centre (GTAC) is to be built at a cost of billions of dollars as part of a concretisation of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill (RIP) currently going through parliament. The RIP designates Internet Service Providers (ISPs) as "public telecommunications systems". As such they are required to give access to detailed information about Internet traffic upon the demand of the Home Secretary, a judge or even a senior police officer. In introducing the legislation Home Secretary Jack Straw reserved the right to demand the placing of specific devices to monitor ISP traffic.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:59 PM Thu 18 May 2000 Categories: Cybercrime , Privacy , WSWS.org
UK government forces through net spy bill - VNUNET

'The UK government is bracing itself for a major fight in the Lords over the cost and scope of legislation forcing ISPs to give police access to customers' internet traffic.'

Posted by SteveC at 03:53 PM Wed 10 May 2000 Categories: Cost to industry , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
Snooping bill under attack again - VNUNET

'The Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Bill, which will give the state powers to eavesdrop on internet traffic, was amended by the government in its third Commons reading on Monday, but without satisfying its critics.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:51 PM Wed 10 May 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , VNUNET
Tories demand tougher computer penalties - BBC

'People who refuse to allow authorities access to coded information on their computers should face a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison, the UK's Conservative party says.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:49 PM Tue 9 May 2000 Categories: BBC , Human Rights , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III)
Cyber-snooping Bill through House of Commons - ZDNET

'Sadly inadequate' RIP bill is branded by some MPs 'a ridiculous effort and a shame on Britain's long standing human rights record' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:47 PM Tue 9 May 2000 Categories: Govt. Consultations , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , ZDNET
Computer crime plan 'bad for business' - BBC

'Controversial proposals to control the interception of e-mail and other communications return to the UK Parliament on Monday, having previously been described appalling and objectionable.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:45 PM Mon 8 May 2000 Categories: BBC , Cost to industry , Cybercrime , Privacy
Coming to a screen near you - The Observer

'Get ready for a virus that will make last week's 'love bug' look laughable. Jason Burke and Nick Paton Walsh report on a fast-growing invisible menace to us all.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:42 PM Sun 7 May 2000 Categories: Cybercrime , The Observer
UK moving to open all (e-)mail - Christian Science Monitor

'By the end of this year, any e-mail to or from a friend or business in England can be read by a British intelligence agent at MI5 headquarters in London.'

Posted by SteveC at 03:38 PM Fri 5 May 2000 Categories: Christian Science Monitor , Cybercrime , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
NTK 2000-05-05 - NTK

'Oh, and we also love Nick Palmer MP, who claimed on Channel Four news that plans were already far advanced for a law that would stop ILOVEYOU ever happening again. Yes, it's that darn RIP bill, still struggling to find supporters in the real world.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:35 PM Fri 5 May 2000 Categories: Govt. Consultations , NTK
Critics launch fresh attack on RIP Bill - VNUNET

'The UK government will come under attack again on Monday at the third reading of its controversial Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:24 PM Fri 5 May 2000 Categories: Govt. Consultations , VNUNET
Spider in the web - The Guardian

'As far as the internet goes, America is the land of the free. But Britain certainly isn't
Free speech on the net: special report' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:19 PM Wed 3 May 2000 Categories: Cybercrime , Privacy , The Guardian
MI5's email snoops - The Guardian

'Yes, MI5 is building a new surveillance centre that will enable it to monitor all British emails and internet transactions. But fear not: that prize ass Tom King MP, outgoing chairman of the parliamentary intelligence committee, reassures us that all warrants for email-tapping will be scrutinised by Lord Nolan, the commissioner for the interception of communications.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:16 PM Wed 3 May 2000 Categories: Cybercrime , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Spies Like Us - The Guardian

'The U.S. government says it doesn’t do it. Russia does it, which surprises no one. Now Great Britain wants to spy on its own citizens’ e-mails. A new British bill would enable law enforcement officials to watch every byte of e-mail as it passes through the country’s networks, in real time. The government’s Home Office says the new system is necessary to catch criminals who do their business online.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:13 PM Wed 3 May 2000 Categories: Cybercrime , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Government to build new email and surfing surveillance centre - ZDNET

'A new centre for monitoring email and Internet communications is to be built by NCIS (National Criminal Intelligence Service) at the cost of £25m, the government said Tuesday.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:09 PM Tue 2 May 2000 Categories: Cybercrime , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , ZDNET
U.K. plan to open Internet spy center draws criticism - CNN

'(CNN) -- The United Kingdom Home Office is responding to the concerns of civil liberties groups over a government plan to open a facility designed to intercept and monitor Internet traffic, including e-mail and encrypted messages.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:06 PM Mon 1 May 2000 Categories: CNN , Cybercrime , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
Spy centre to spread its web - BBC

'The government is to build a £25m spy centre to monitor criminal gangs through their use of the internet. The Government Technical Assistance Centre (GTAC) is likely to be used to unscramble coded internet messages, tap phones and intercept e-mails.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:03 PM Mon 1 May 2000 Categories: BBC , Cybercrime , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)