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March 2000 Archives

Website campaign to derail legislation - BBC

'Stand.org.uk, comprising e-commerce entrepreneurs and new media thinkers, say that the public has sent more than 1,500 faxes from its website to MPs within two weeks of the launch of their new campaign against the bill.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:31 PM Fri 31 Mar 2000 Categories: BBC , Govt. Consultations , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III)
RIP IT UP - SchNEWS

'Imagine if the police or government officials could force you to hand over your house keys, so they could let themselves in and have a quick shuffle through the mail every morning. Well, in a new draft of Home Office legislation, the cyber equivalent of ‘state mail sorting’ will make any computer user failing to hand over their encryption keys (or computer password codes) a criminal facing up to two years in prison. And under an even darker scenario, if you happen to ‘tip’ someone off that their e-mails are being screened, then you could face a five year stretch inside.' link

Posted by SteveC at 01:53 PM Fri 31 Mar 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , SchNEWS
New law opens up private data to MI5 - VNUNET

'Users attending the fifth Scrambling for Safety conference last week were in for a shock when they gathered in London to debate the UK government's draft legislation on bugging communications.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:29 AM Fri 31 Mar 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
Protection or persecution? - The Guardian

'Feelings are running high in the e-world over the RIP - regulation of investigatory powers - bill. Here, Peter Sommer gives the background to a debate between two of the leading protagonists' link

Posted by SteveC at 01:49 PM Thu 30 Mar 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
MI5 bugging exempt from privacy act - The Guardian

'Covert surveillance by MI5, MI6 and the police, including tapping phones and bugging homes, will be exempt from challenge under a new right to privacy contained in the Human Rights Act, it has emerged.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:25 AM Mon 27 Mar 2000 Categories: Human Rights , Privacy , The Guardian
It's RIP basic human rights in 'worst UK legislation ever' looms - The Guardian

'To LSE for a conference on the Interior Ministry's Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Bill, currently in Committee in the Mother of Parliaments. Readers of this column will know that, among other things, this odious piece of legislation reverses the ancient principle of natural justice that says that a person should be pre sumed innocent until proven guilty.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:22 AM Sun 26 Mar 2000 Categories: Govt. Consultations , Human Rights , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
NTK 2000-03-24 - NTK

Like a supply teacher late for his first class, Charles Clarke, Home Office minister in charge of Not Being Scared by The Crypto Freaks, looked most put out by the giggling during his speech at Wednesday's SCRAMBLING FOR SAFETY. Whenever he tried to praise the work done by the experts in the audience, the experts laughed - and not in a nice, self-deprecatory way.

Posted by SteveC at 12:18 AM Fri 24 Mar 2000 Categories: Govt. Consultations , NTK , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III)
Snooping powers could harm cheap net access - VNUNET

'Tumbling internet access charges in the UK could be abruptly halted if the government forces ISPs to maintain expensive email interception facilities. Under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Bill, the government wants police agencies to have more control over electronic communications, including the power to intercept email.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:14 AM Fri 24 Mar 2000 Categories: RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
Ripping into U.K. Privacy Bill - Wired News

'LONDON -- Privacy advocates say a proposed bill that could force Internet service providers hand over data traffic information would harm Britain's e-commerce environment and encourage e-business companies to locate elsewhere. But in keeping with the heated tone the debate has taken, one government official attending a conference Wednesday at the London School of Economics claimed the bill would help "make the U.K. the best place in the world for e-commerce." ' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:11 AM Thu 23 Mar 2000 Categories: Govt. Consultations , Human Rights , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , Wired News
UK government answers snooping bill critics - VNUNET

'The Home Office minister in charge of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Bill has publicly defended the controversial legislation against accusations that it breeches human rights.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:09 AM Thu 23 Mar 2000 Categories: Govt. Consultations , Human Rights , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , VNUNET
RIP Bill comes under fresh attack - ZDNET

'On the eve of a privacy conference, two leading human rights organisations have accused the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill of violating human rights laws. A forthcoming government bill concerning Internet communication directly contravenes the European Convention of Human Rights, according to a report published on Wednesday by leading civil liberty rights groups.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:05 AM Wed 22 Mar 2000 Categories: Govt. Consultations , Human Rights , ZDNET
Industry tackles UK government over snooping bill - VNUNET

'Industry groups and encryption users will today get their first chance to grill UK government ministers and Home Office officials in public about the controversial communications snooping bill.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:03 AM Wed 22 Mar 2000 Categories: Govt. Consultations , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , VNUNET
RIP bill gets buried under fax mountain - ZDNET

'Stand.org.uk sets up fax protest in response to government's controversial RIP Bill
MPs have been bombarded by thousands of faxes from Internet users incensed at the government's controversial Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Bill.' link

Posted by SteveC at 12:00 AM Tue 21 Mar 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , ZDNET
NTK 2000-03-17 - NTK

'St Patrick's Day, and a fitting time to answer a few mails we've had regarding the RIP Bill. Given, say our correspondents, the new insecurities installed into ISPs by the Bill would a solution be to log onto Irish ISPs, given their government's more enlightened approach to preserving privacy?' link

Posted by SteveC at 11:58 PM Fri 17 Mar 2000 Categories: NTK , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III)
More holes in net privacy - FIPR releases

Letter to the Guardian by Director Caspar Bowden:

'Charles Clarke's view of the regulation of the investigatory powers bill's decryption powers (Letters, March 10) is "we will only prosecute if you're guilty". Internet users manage a plethora of passwords to protect email, files, and website registrations. Failure to produce any password required by any public authority for any official purpose (S.46.2.b.ii) means two years' jail. The court will convict if it believes you were lying about forgetting a password, or uncooperative in finding it.

No evidence is needed of involvement in a substantive crime. Moreover, a lifetime gagging clause prevents telling what happened on penalty of a further five years (S.50). The data protection act mandates data controllers to take adequate precautions including encryption, so they are in jeopardy either way.'

Posted by SteveC at 11:51 PM Wed 15 Mar 2000 Categories: FIPR releases , Reverse of burden of proof
The key to security (Letter from Charles Clarke) - The Guardian

The regulation of investigatory powers RIP bill updates vital powers for a changing technological world in a way consistent with the requirements of the European convention on human rights (Leader, March 7). These powers will be subject to safeguards and external supervision more tightly drawn than ever before. link

Posted by SteveC at 03:20 PM Fri 10 Mar 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
Net sets a legal challenge - The Guardian

'Your leader (March 7) on some of the implications of the regulation of investigatory powers (RIP) bill was wrong on one important count: there is no presumption of guilt. Before a person might be convicted of failing to produce for the police the necessary key to decrypt an encrypted file, a jury has to be convinced that the person concerned was in possession of that key. A jury would therefore be invited to conclude that the person's failure now to produce the key was simply an attempt to avoid disclosing the content of their encrypted messages or files.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:17 PM Wed 8 Mar 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
Big Brother delves into your inbox - BBC

'Student Julie Ann Davies was "astonished" when she was arrested over her links with former MI5 spy David Shayler, because she'd had no idea she was under police investigation. It is speculated that she had been the subject of a covert operation, and that police or MI5 had been intercepting her e-mails for some time, entirely without her knowledge.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:14 PM Wed 8 Mar 2000 Categories: BBC , Human Rights , Privacy
Opposition Against Encryption Bill - ComputerUser.com

'A wave of media-led resentment against the proposed Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) bill, which critics say will give the government the all-clear to monitor private e-mail and mobile phone conversations, has started rising. UK civil liberties groups say that the legislation, if enacted, would result in otherwise innocent people going to jail if they lose their data encryption codes.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:11 PM Wed 8 Mar 2000 Categories: ComputerUser.com , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III)
RIP for basic liberties - The Guardian

'Michael Gapes, Labour MP for Ilford South, told the Commons yesterday how his father as a postman would have to deliver letters to a certain place where they were opened then resealed before continuing their journey to the recipient's house. He was speaking during the second reading of the controversial regulation of investigatory powers (RIP) bill. Everyone knows that interception takes place and that it is the duty of the authorities to hunt down drug-pushers, paedophiles and money-launderers by all legal means. The RIP bill still fails to strike the right balance between an individual's right to privacy and the state's duty to track down criminals. Even Jack Straw at his most avuncular could not explain why the right to authorise interception should rest with him (and his less avuncular successors) rather than with judges as in many other countries.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:06 PM Tue 7 Mar 2000 Categories: Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
Computer crime plans attacked - BBC

'Laws proposed by the UK Government to enable the interception of electronic communications in the battle against organised crime have been criticised as appalling and objectionable.The Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill debate was opened by the Home Secretary Jack Straw who said law enforcement agencies worldwide were worried about the criminal use of encryption to send coded electronic messages. He said UK and the US was putting in place a package of measures to tackle the problem.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:05 PM Tue 7 Mar 2000 Categories: BBC , Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III)
U.K. Crypto Law a Key Issue - Wired News

'LONDON -- Law enforcement officials speaking to the House of Commons said criminals were using the Internet and without new powers those crimes would go undetected by police. Their comments came Monday as home secretary Jack Straw announced the second reading of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill. The measure would update legislation and give more power to law enforcement agencies to intercept electronic communications.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:02 PM Tue 7 Mar 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , Wired News
UK email interception bill stumbles - VNUNET

'The government's proposed communications interception bill could be delayed after the Conservative Party asked for a key part of the proposal to be changed. Shadow Home Secretary, Anne Widdecombe, said during The Regulation of Investigatory Powers Bill's second reading in the House of Commons today, that the Tories would oppose the third reading of the bill if the 'burden of proof' part of it was not changed.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:00 PM Tue 7 Mar 2000 Categories: RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , VNUNET
Editorial comment: Spies in the web - Financial Times

'Big Brother only had television cameras to spy into our living rooms. Today's governments have computers, with power far beyond anything imagined by George Orwell in his chilling novel 1984. But to make best use of their surveillance of internet data, they need to have the keys to the encryption systems now routinely used to defend privacy. Yesterday Jack Straw introduced a bill in Britain's House of (Commons that would give the authorities more intrusive powers than in any other western democracy.' link

Posted by SteveC at 03:08 PM Mon 6 Mar 2000 Categories: Financial Times , Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III)
NTK lead - NTK

'On Monday, the REGULATION OF INVESTIGATORY POWERS BILL will get its second reading in the Commons. Then it goes to committee, then it becomes law, and then you'll never hear from it again, because talking about most of its powers will get you five years in prison. So, when the police ask your ISP to put a tap on your mail, you won't hear about it. When your local trades and standards officer decides to take a look at your browser log for the last month, you won't hear about it. And when they come and get your private encryption key so that can read your friend's mails, you won't be able to tell your friend - or us - that it happened. Hell, you won't even be able to change your key if that might give us a clue.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:56 PM Fri 3 Mar 2000 Categories: NTK , Privacy , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
Government snooping will cost taxpayers millions - ZDNET

'Plans to seize encryption keys from crime suspects will leave them vulnerable to theft and misuse. Government snooping plans will cost the taxpayer "hundreds of millions" of pounds, according to a report published on Monday.' link

Posted by SteveC at 02:50 PM Wed 1 Mar 2000 Categories: FIPR releases , Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , ZDNET