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June 2002 Archives

Blunkett shelves access to data plans - The Guardian

Blunkett shelves access to data plans - "Ministers were yesterday forced into a humiliating climbdown"

Posted by SteveC at 03:50 PM Wed 19 Jun 2002 Categories: Govt. Consultations , The Guardian
Blunkett admits error as he shelves 'snooper' Bill - The Independent

Blunkett admits error as he shelves 'snooper' Bill - 'Mr Blunkett said he would not now go ahead until a "broad public debate" had been held on privacy'

Posted by SteveC at 03:49 PM Wed 19 Jun 2002 Categories: Govt. Consultations , The Independent
Blunkett backs down over 'snoop' laws - RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2)

Blunkett backs down over 'snoop' laws - Home Office "blundered", backs off for consultation in new year

Posted by SteveC at 03:52 PM Tue 18 Jun 2002 Categories: BBC , Govt. Consultations , RIP Statutory Instrument (Part I Chapter 2)
FIPR welcomes Government rethink on snooping powers - FIPR releases

FIPR welcomes Government rethink on snooping powers

Posted by SteveC at 03:29 PM Tue 18 Jun 2002 Categories: FIPR releases
FIPR welcomes Government rethink on snooping powers - FIPR releases

The Home Office is reported to have postponed its proposals to amend the Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Act to allow a huge increase in the official that can access personal details of phone calls and emails.

Attention was first drawn to the highly technical Regulations encapsulating this change by an FIPR Press Release on 10th June. The story has since become headline news and the Government has now decided not to proceed with these changes.

Ian Brown, Director of FIPR welcomed this news, "these proposals were poorly considered, poorly justified and over the past week have been condemned by almost everyone outside of Whitehall. The Home Office must now tear them up and start again from first principles."

He continued, "we are as keen as anyone else in seeing wrongdoing investigated, but we don't think that handing out such wide-reaching powers to every bureaucrat in the land is compatible with living in a free society. The Government needs to carefully consider whether self-authorisation can ever be appropriate for this type of invasion of privacy and they need to pay a lot more attention to the oversight regime. An Interception Commissioner who doesn't have the resources to open all his mail is no credible way to ensure that abuse is detected."

Read the full press release here

Posted by SteveC at 01:24 PM Tue 18 Jun 2002 Categories: Data retention , FIPR releases , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2)
It's here, it's now: Big Brother's reign has begun - The Telegraph

'Of all the weapons in the armoury of New Labour, there is nothing more terrifying than Excalibur, the party's computer database. Tories speak of it in hushed, broken tones, as the woad-painted tribes must once have discussed the tortoise technique of the legions.' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:36 PM Thu 13 Jun 2002 Categories: Privacy , The Telegraph
The net closes on civil liberties - The Guardian

'My parents and I came to the UK as refugees from Poland in 1969. In Poland, our phone was tapped, letters were opened, movements monitored and associations carefully noted and used against us. After 33 years in a country I have grown to love, it is surprising that the government wants to read my emails, monitor my phone calls, work out my movements, who I associate with and how I spend my money' link

Posted by SteveC at 06:46 PM Thu 13 Jun 2002 Categories: Human Rights , Privacy , RIP Forced Decryption (Part III) , The Guardian
Government plans snooping expansion - VNUNET

'The government is planning a massive extension of the number of public bodies that can snoop on details of telephone calls, email and web traffic.' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:25 PM Wed 12 Jun 2002 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , VNUNET
CIVIL RIGHTS FURY OVER E-MAIL ACCESS - The Mirror

'CIVIL rights groups yesterday blasted moves to give dozens of Government bodies sweeping new powers to snoop on our email and telephone records.' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:23 PM Wed 12 Jun 2002 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Mirror
New powers put privacy laws to the test - ZDNET

'The government's move to give more agencies access to personal Internet and telecoms information will put a strain on the Data Protection Act and other institutions, say critics' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:21 PM Wed 12 Jun 2002 Categories: Human Rights , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , ZDNET
UK pushes boundaries of citizen surveillance - The Guardian

'The data retention powers to be handed to a wide range of UK government agencies will exceed those available anywhere else in the world, writes Neil McIntosh' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:02 PM Wed 12 Jun 2002 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Stop the snoopers - The Guardian

'The decision of the government to intrude upon our private communications (Government sweeps aside privacy rights, June 11) is reason enough for this Labour party member to review his membership.' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:00 PM Wed 12 Jun 2002 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
Councils granted all-seeing powers - The Times

'SEVEN government departments and all local councils will be able to access details of everyone's telephone and internet records under a sweeping expansion of Big Brother powers planned by David Blunkett.' link

Posted by SteveC at 06:58 PM Wed 12 Jun 2002 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Times
Government sweeps aside privacy rights - The Guardian

'Ministers were last night accused of conducting a systematic campaign to undermine the right to privacy as it emerged that a host of government departments, local councils and quangos are to be given the power to demand the communications records of every British telephone and internet user.' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:45 PM Tue 11 Jun 2002 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Guardian
'Massive abuse' of privacy feared - BBC

'Plans to increase the number of organisations that can look at records of what you do online could lead to widespread abuse of personal information, warn experts.' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:39 PM Tue 11 Jun 2002 Categories: BBC , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
Snoops a go-go: UK gov goes mad on privacy invasion - The Register

'The UK government intends to implement sweeping extensions to the snooping powers of official bodies before its controversial Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act (RIPA) even comes into force. RIPA was bludgeoned through Parliament two years ago in the face of heavy opposition, and is to come into force later this year.' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:27 PM Tue 11 Jun 2002 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Register
UK plans to extend snooping powers - NewScientist

'The UK government has revealed plans to extend the range of officials allowed to snoop on people by accessing their email and phone records. Privacy campaigners say they are "appalled".' link

Posted by SteveC at 06:55 PM Tue 11 Jun 2002 Categories: NewScientist , Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
Civil liberties groups attack 'snooper's charter' - ePolitix

'MPs will next week debate moves to allow government departments, agencies and local councils gain access to private emails and telephone records. The move, dubbed a "snooper's charter" by critics, will give new powers to departments including the department of the environment, the Home Office and the DTI.' link

Posted by SteveC at 06:52 PM Tue 11 Jun 2002 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , ePolitix
FIPR Appalled by Huge Increase in Government Snooping - FIPR releases

FIPR Appalled by Huge Increase in Government Snooping

Posted by SteveC at 03:32 PM Mon 10 Jun 2002 Categories: FIPR releases
FIPR appalled by huge increase in Government snooping - FIPR releases

The Regulation of Investigatory Powers (RIP) Act is to be amended before it even comes into force to dramatically increase the number of official bodies that can access personal details of phone calls and emails. The Act was hugely controversial when it went through Parliament in 2000, with defeats for the Government in the Lords and significant changes being made to prevent its complete rejection.

Now the powers that were originally only given to the police, customs, secret services and the taxman are to be made available to a huge range of Government departments, local authorities, the NHS and even to Consignia (the Post Office).

Ian Brown, Director of FIPR commented, "I am appalled at this huge increase in the scope of Government snooping. Two years ago, we were deeply concerned that these powers were to be given to the police without any judicial oversight. Now they're handing them out to a practically endless queue of bureaucrats in Whitehall and Town Halls."

Read the full press release here

Posted by SteveC at 01:25 PM Mon 10 Jun 2002 Categories: FIPR releases , RIP Comms Data (Part I Chapter 2) , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1)
Police to spy on all emails - The Observer

'Millions of personal emails, other internet information and telephone records are to be made accessible to the police and intelligence services in a move that has been denounced by critics as one of the most wide-ranging extensions of state power over private information.' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:47 PM Sun 9 Jun 2002 Categories: Privacy , RIP Interception (Part I Chapter 1) , The Observer
A new blow to our privacy - The Guardian

'Last week's unexpected vote by the European Parliament to give sweeping powers to EU governments to monitor internet, phone and email traffic has angered civil liberties groups everywhere. It will allow governments to force phone and internet companies to keep detailed records of customers' web, phone and email usage for a long time.' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:49 PM Thu 6 Jun 2002 Categories: Privacy , The Guardian
Questions over net snooping centre - BBC

'A controversial internet snooping centre to be opened in the summer by the UK Government could cause more problems than it solves, experts say.' link

Posted by SteveC at 07:43 PM Thu 6 Jun 2002 Categories: BBC , Privacy